Okay, so I’m all about people being whatever they want. If you want to identify as a Kawasaki dirtbike that wears a dress and a coonskin cap, then let your freak flag fly. My caveat is that you don’t try to force your opinions on others OR their children.

But trying to brainwash children is what too many in the activist arm of the LGBT community seems to think is an acceptable thing to do, and another drop in this bucket of activist muck comes in the form of second-grade substitute teacher Meghan Buell of South Bend Community school in Indiana.

Meghan is a biological male who identifies as a female, and he gets a kick out of confusing children about his gender identity. At least that’s what he told parents during a presentation of his teaching methodology during a presentation.

From HeraldArgus.org:

Substitute teacher Meghan Buell gets a kick out of her second-grade students who ask if she’s a boy or a girl. She tells them she’s a girl, of course.

Then they invariably ask why her voice is so deep.

“I don’t know,” she tells them. “I was born this way.”

One child, trying to help the transgender woman, suggested she eat a cough drop to help her voice.

“I’ll give that a try,” she said she told the child. “Thanks.”

The cough drop didn’t help, Buell told about 40 people who attended a seminar Friday at the La Porte County Complex.

This introduction of gender identity to small children without the parent’s knowledge or consent naturally raised some concerns.

The Indiana Liberty Coalition raised these concerns to South Bend Community School superintendent Dr. Kenneth Spells. Spells passed the complaints to administration’s Director of Human Resources, Dr. Todd Cummings.

Cummings dismissed any fault for Buell’s words at the presentation and told the Coalition that “the City of South Bend and St. Joseph County have a broad Human Rights Ordinance which protects all citizens against discrimination in employment based on gender identity. Ms. Buell is the Executive Director of TREES and was speaking in LaPorte in that capacity-not as our employee.”

Problem is, Buell is presenting her teaching methodology, not just arbitrarily giving a presentation about teaching kids about transgenderism.

This would not fly in almost any other situation, but it seems to if you’re part of the protected transgender community.

Peter Heck at the Resurgent puts it best as he lays out the exact same scenario, but with different actors:

Imagine if a local youth minister from South Bend was employed as a substitute teacher. Later, he was speaking at a Christian youth conference and spoke about how second grade children were asking him about the cross necklace he wore, at which point he presented them with the Gospel message of Jesus. Concerned parents wrote to Dr. Spell about the obvious proselytizing that was occurring in the classrooms of his school system.

Would Spell pass it on to Cummings who would write dismissively that the youth minister was speaking at a conference in his capacity as a minister, not an employee of the school? Or would the two men rush to the press to assure that the matter was being dealt with, and that all substitute teachers would be expected to adhere to school-appropriate curriculum?

Heck’s scenario would make national news. Lawyers and activist groups would flock to the scene, and publicized court battles would result in a cultural war. If you don’t believe me, look what happened when a Christian Colorado baker refused to make a gay wedding cake.

This rule doesn’t apply to the LGBT community though. A gay coffee shop owner can kick people out of his store on the basis of their faith, but don’t you dare run afoul of an activist group’s pet cause.

But at least in these scenarios, adults can fight back. Children don’t know any better.