The act of uploading naked photos of someone else to Facebook to get back at them, known more commonly as “revenge porn” is considered a misdemeanor in most states, but a full-on felony in others. However, the illegality of uploading nude photos of someone doesn’t stop many from doing it.

That’s why Facebook is offering you some safety measures to prevent a photo of your junk from appearing on people’s timelines. All you have to do, says Facebook, is send them nude photos of yourself.

According to the LA Times, Facebook is looking to curb the problem of revenge porn. This is on the heels of the Facebook group “Marines United” being shut down for distributing nude photos of their fellow female soldiers.

“Revenge porn isn’t uncommon in the United States. According to a 2016 study by Data and Society, 4% of U.S. internet users have fallen victim to it, and 10% of women under 30 have had someone threaten to post explicit photos of them online against their will,” reported the LA Times.

Facebook reassures everyone that they won’t be keeping the photo, but will store a “digital footprint” so that image matching technology can identify the photo should it be uploaded one day, and immediately shut it down.

The problem is that you must first upload the photo to Facebook so the copy can be created, which some experts say doesn’t exactly make it all that safe.

“Yes, they’re not storing a copy, but the image is still being transmitted and processed. Leaving forensic evidence in memory and potentially on disk,” said digital forensics expert Lesley Carhart. “My specialty is digital forensics, and I literally recover deleted images from computer systems all day — off disk and out of system memory. It’s not trivial to destroy all trace of files, including metadata and thumbnails.”

The LA Times reports that testing for this tech will begin in Australia, but will soon hit the states.