Hillary Clinton has a long list of people to blame for her 2016 loss. From Bernie Sanders to white women, Clinton has worked harder to put the fault on anyone but herself than she did trying to get elected.

But next up on the chopping block? Her former boss, and former President, Barack Obama.

Speaking to Hugh Hewitt on his radio show, Clinton lamented that she wasn’t good enough to follow Obama’s act, and couldn’t run on the same platform of “change” that he did.

From Fox News:

“It is true that when you run to succeed a two-term president of your own party, you have a historical headwind blowing against you,” Clinton told radio host Hugh Hewitt. “It’s not just this campaign can be set apart from everything that’s ever happened in our politics. It is a challenge.”

“If you are both the candidate defending a lot of the areas of agreement, but also putting forth an agenda for change, which is what I tried to do, it is often difficult to get the second part of that message through,” she added. “So I do think it was a problem.”

“I was proud to serve in the Obama administration. I did not agree with everything that President Obama decided, but on balance, I really think he did what had to be done to rescue the economy, which as we all remember, was in desperate straits,” Clinton told the conservative radio host. “He did chart a course in the world that favored diplomacy and negotiation, something that I think is important.”

Clinton can point at others for her loss until the proverbial political cows come home, but what her loss really boils down to wasn’t that Obama’s act was hard to follow, or that women didn’t vote for her because they were ordered not to by men.

As repeated studies have shown, it was Hillary’s promotion of a culture that alienated many Americans that caused voters to shy away. Clinton, along with the bevy of people who promoted her in the mainstream, along with the various social justice groups who seemed to support her, was wholly unattractive to Americans, and thus they voted for a guy people liked less than her.

In short, Clinton has no one to blame but her own ideological stances, her inability to sell her stances, and the company she kept.