If it wasn’t for the young men now known as the “greatest generation,” going off to fight a tyranny so evil that it rocked the nations of the world, we wouldn’t have the freedoms, prosperity, and comfort we have today. That much is for certain.

Well, it’s certain for those of us with the ability to think rationally and logically. For the first world social justice warriors and feminists, appreciation for the actions of men, no matter how grand and beneficial, is something they just can’t bring themselves to do.

Angry over someone deleting all the women out of the new Star Wars: The Last Jedi,  Logan James decided to strike back by deleting men out of a movie. Instead of choosing something like Fast and Furious, or Troy, or some other movie men tend to show up to, James decided to cut all the men out of Steven Spielberg’s Saving Private Ryan.

The result was a Twitter video over two minutes long that featured little more than a few shots of women, but mostly what you see are the graves of fallen WW2 heroes. Otherwise, what James creates something that resembles a modern movie…in other words, something just awful.

If James really wanted to edit out all the scenes that contained men, he failed miserably. What he ended up keeping in were the resting places of great men who died defending his very existence. The fact that James overlooked this fact is troublesome, but I’ll get to that in a moment.

What should have been something people rolled their eyes at and rightfully verbally slapped James for became something celebrated by social justice warriors. This was best demonstrated by Glamour Magazine who called James an “internet hero.”

Clicking on the link in the tweet brings you to an article whereby Glamour writer Evelyn Wang calls James’s deletion of soldiers “hilarious.”

I want everyone to know I understand that Tom Hanks, Vin Diesel, Ed Burns, et al are actors and not the actual soldiers, but they are depicting real life heroes in a retelling of a real life story. The film is a realistic and gritty retelling that retraces the footsteps of some very brave men who gave their lives so that I can sit here, drink a scotch, and freely type my opinions for the public to see while you read it.

The story is one that deserves respect.

As you watch James’s video that primarily feature the graves of better men, it’s hard not to feel a tinge of anger as he holds it up as some sort of strike against men’s rights activists. In his attempt to show those MRA’s a thing or two, he disrespects the legacy of men who died for him. But this seems very lost on James, and I know that because he and I had a back and forth about it.

The fact that James can’t seem to understand that while it is a movie, it was depiction that actually happened, and pays homage to the men who did what they did in the face of gruesome death and destruction.

But on top of that is the fact that the James’s film was “hilarious” to observers who think the way he does. I’ll remind you that Jame’s film primarily sports the graves of fallen U.S. soldiers who died attempting to keep America free from tyranny, oppression, and bigotry so vile that it created the Holocaust.

These men deserve reverence, respect, and thanks. James and the staff at Glamour think that so long as they feel they’re getting one up on those MRA’s — many of whom are good, decent men and not the villains feminists make them out to be — then they don’t care who gets disrespected in the crossfire.

For some reason, James and his kind lack the respect. Why?

As a millennial myself, there is a disconnect between that time period and mine. WW2 was something our grandparents or great grandparents went through. Even our parents didn’t have to grow up in that world, and the best they have are the stories their parents may or may not have told them.

But that disconnect doesn’t excuse that disrespect. These were men with family members who still remember them, and who sport their photos on their walls and in books. Who still visit their graves, and name their children’s children after them.

James and the Glamour staff are so wrapped up in their hatred of one group, in their own flame war, that they forgot about that very real one that decided the fate of billions of lives and the men who fought to make sure that fate was the best outcome possible. It kills me that millennials, the generation on deck to take over when the last shift goes, sinks so far as to forget what was done for them, and what’s more, not care.

What kind of leaders will we be when that kind of sacrifice and goodness is laughed off by many of our peers? Where our dislike or hatred of one group gives us license to blind ourselves to the bigger picture and forget what made us who we are?

It may seem like I’m being overly critical about deleting some men out of movie, but in truth, the fact that it can be done so casually and then laughed about by many makes me worry about just how ignorant and self-absorbed too many in my generation are.