The National Rifle Association is an odd kind of organization in that it thrives when it’s put under pressure. Whenever a shooting occurs, the left likes to point a good portion of its collective fingers right at the NRA, causing many gun owners and right-leaning individuals to flock to it.

Sometimes in order to boost the most effective organization that protects our 2A rights with money and support, and sometimes just out of pure spite.

Naturally, the March for Our Lives took aim at the NRA quite a bit. Since the Parkland students were given a podium in focus of every major media outlet’s camera, the NRA has been on the chopping block. This culminated in speeches, chants, and signs that all painted the NRA — not the failed law enforcement, or even the shooter — as the culprit for the Parkland shooting.

So you can guess that for every bit of negative attention given to the NRA, it saw that opposite and equal reaction that Newton’s law mentioned.

The Daily Caller first noted the increased search for “NRA membership” on Google.

According to Google’s explanation of the numbers to the left of the chart, they “represent search interest relative to the highest point on the chart for the given region and time. A value of 100 is the peak popularity for the term. A value of 50 means that the term is half as popular. A score of 0 means there was not enough data for this term.”

In other words, Saturday’s “March For Our Lives” demonstrated rocketed interest in NRA membership to “peak popularity.”

Admittedly, we can’t translate Google searches to actually signing up for an NRA membership.

What we do know at this time is that after the Parkland shooting initially happened, interest in membership spiked 4,900 percent according to Google. This was alongside consistent declarations of signing up or renewing NRA membership by those on social media.

We may not have exact numbers, but rest assured, it’s highly likely that NRA has seen a massive spike in membership due to the attacks it and the 2nd Amendment have sustained over the last few months.

(h/t: Louder with Crowder)