If it seems like a societal norm, then the social justice warrior crowd will find a way to slap the term “privilege” on it and explain why that group of people has it so much easier than everyone else.

The SJWs have a host of “privilege” arguments at their command used primarily as a way to justify dismissing your arguments. Whether you’re white, male, thin, or even have straight hair, you have privilege according to team SocJus.

And now Christians are also a group just completely laced with privilege according to George Washington University’s Multicultural Student Services Center, which is putting on an event to teach students just how privileged those darn Christians can be.

From College Fix:

The Christian privilege event aims to make people aware of the privileges that Christians have and “what is meant by privilege overall and white privilege specifically,” the event description states. Furthermore, the event will try to educate those of the “role of denial when it comes to white privilege” and the difference between “equality and equity.”

By the end of the training, the organizers want participants to be able to name “at least three examples of Christian privilege” and “at least three ways to be an ally with a non-Christian person,” the website states.

Organizers also want the participants to be able to describe words like: “privilege, Christian privilege, denial, quality, equity, Christianity, bias, unconscious bias, micro-aggression, ally,” the website states.

Incredibly, there’s been no word yet on when the social justice community will talk about the privileges it enjoys, such as a sympathetic mainstream media or their ability to discriminate and hate without institutional consequence, but I’m sure we’ll get there.

However, without attending the workshop, I can correct the assumption of George Washington University’s more snowflakey students quite easily.

Christian bakers are being forced to defend their religious practices regarding their own business in the supreme court against an LGBT community that was able to force one Christian Colorado baker into sensitivity training after he simply wouldn’t bake a cake for a gay wedding. So privileged are Christians that a gay coffee shop owner, however, can forcibly eject Christians from his establishment with zero blowback.

Such is the privilege of Christians that the mainstream media can actually lie about the protections offered to those wishing to abide by their religious doctrines, and sparking an entire public firestorm culminating in an innocent family actually being put in danger.

And if you want even more examples of just how persecuted Christians are outside of the first world, feel free to watch this video from Prager U about the horrors many face for their faith.

Every group in the United States has its own advantages and disadvantages, however, if you’re going to try to sell the world that Christians have it better than everyone else, I’ve got gallons of cold ice water to throw on that garbage fire of a theory.

Practicing Christianity comes with sacrifices, and oftentimes a good deal of hatred and bigotry directed straight at you for positions many Christians don’t even hold. You can ask Mike Pence about that, and the attacks he suffered for his faith at the hands of Olympian Adam Rippon and The View Host Joy Behar.

Being Christian is not the easy, happy-go-lucky experience many believe it to be.

As usual, C.S. Lewis put holding this faith best.

“I didn’t go to religion to make me happy,” wrote Lewis. “I always knew a bottle of Port would do that. If you want a religion to make you feel really comfortable, I certainly don’t recommend Christianity.”