Can a state create legislation that could please even the most anti-gun law American? Missouri is going to try to find out.

According to The Sentinel, a bill is expected to pass the Missouri Senate that would nullify every Federal gun law and regulation. Additionally, it would make enforcement of those laws by federal officers within the State of Missouri a criminal offense:

Like it’s predecessor, SB613, Bill SB367 and it’s companion, House Bill HB786, would prevent all state agencies and their employees from enforcing any federal law that infringes the Second Amendment in any way, including gun registrations, fees, fines, licenses and bans. Originally authored in 2014, a former version of the bill was also passed, but vetoed by then Missouri Governor Jay Nixon.

Since Republicans control both Missouri’s House and Senate, the bill is expected to pass.

The magical party of the legislation reads like something straight out of a libertarian’s fantasy novel:

“All federal acts, laws, executive orders, administrative orders, court orders, rules, and regulations, whether past, present, or future, which infringe on the people’s right to keep and bear arms as guaranteed by the Second Amendment to the United States I and Section 23 of the Missouri Constitution shall be invalid in this state, shall not be recognized by this state, shall be specifically rejected by this state, and shall be considered null and void and of no effect in this state.”

As the Sentinal highlighted, the legislation goes into detail so no lawmaker can misunderstand what is and isn’t prohibited in the law, calling it “pro-gun legislation with teeth.”

These stipulations are as follows:

(a) Any tax, levy, fee, or stamp imposed on firearms, firearm accessories, or ammunition not common to all other goods and services which might reasonably be expected to create a chilling effect on the purchase or ownership of those items by law-abiding citizens;

(b) Any registering or tracking of firearms, firearm accessories, or ammunition which might reasonably be expected to create a chilling effect on the purchase or ownership of those items by law-abiding citizens;

(c) Any registering or tracking of the owners of firearms, firearm accessories, or ammunition which might reasonably be expected to create a chilling effect on the purchase or ownership of those items by law-abiding citizens;

(d) Any act forbidding the possession, ownership, or use or transfer of a firearm, firearm accessory, or ammunition by law-abiding citizens; and

(e) Any act ordering the confiscation of firearms, firearm accessories, or ammunition from law-abiding citizens

Sticking it to the federal government when it comes to telling us what we can and can’t do with our own privately owned firearms is a pretty gutsy move, especially in the wake of the New Zealand shooting that took the lives of 50 people.

Renewed calls for stricter gun laws could be heard from every corner of the first world. That Missouri is taking the opposite tack and seeing to it that any gunman is going to be confronted with law-abiding civilians is statistically the better move.