If you ask 100 people what is rude and offensive, you’re going to get 100 different answers, and those answers shift with time.

This is only one of the reasons the Founding Fathers made free speech an important part of our Constitution. The first part, in fact.

However, we live during the days of feelings over facts, and the offended wearing the fattest crown, and therefore the concept of free speech is now being looked at as a negative on society, especially from college-aged students. This is why so many attacks on free speech have been seen from campuses across the nation.

The problem got bad enough that President Donald Trump decided to issue an executive order that revokes federal funding to colleges and universities should they restrict the free speech rights of their students.

In order to get a good pulse reading on how the students looked at the concept of free speech, Campus Reform’s Cabot Phillips headed to Marymount University to interview a few of the students to get their take on things.

Sadly, many of the students there seem to believe that free speech is all well and good up until someone gets offended.

“I think if it’s hateful and disrespectful to specific groups, then that’s not okay,” said one student.

One girl told Phillips that no one has the right to be disrespectful. Another said that if you’re saying racial slurs then you should be escorted off campus, and should be required to get a permit to say certain things in advance. Another said that if it reflects badly on the school then it’s crossing the line.

Not every student felt that speech should be so restricted. One girl said that people may have different takes on things, and Universities shouldn’t police speech. Another said hate speech isn’t something that should exactly be thrown around but everyone is entitled to their opinion.

The battle for free speech on campus has been a long fight. In 2017, Rep. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio) was issuing threats to colleges that wouldn’t allow conservative commentators to speak on campus out of political bias, a consistent problem that continues to this day.