One feminist who thought she was doing goddess’s work harassed a group of construction workers in order to shame them for a nearby sign and thought she’d brag about her exploits on Twitter, only to find out that Twitter isn’t as impressed as she may have anticipated.

Asst. Prof of Sociology at the Washington University at St. Louis, Caitlyn Collins, posted a tweet that she had stumbled across a group of construction workers who were going about their business next to a sign that read “men at work.” Outraged that such a sign would exist, Collins targeted one of the workers and proceeded to berate him over it.

“What if there’s a woman on your crew?” Collins claimed to have asked.

The man responded that he didn’t know, and upon being asked if there were any women, told her that there were none. Collins immediately found her next move.

“Do you think maybe they’re related?” asked Collins.

She then claimed the man then had the “awkwardest face.”

The tweet was then exposed by multiple people. While Collins didn’t delete it, she soon found the need to take her account private after she was properly ratio’d on Twitter by internet denizens who found her entitled behavior disgusting.

Screenshot: Twitter

Rest assured, the internet responded in droves.

The truth is that women typically don’t enter fields of manual labor for many reasons, from it being too hard on the body to being less flexible.

Collins ideological kin tends not to raise any kind of alarms about the lack of women in fields that require you to get dirty, such as waste management or mining. They tend to raise the alarm in fields where power or high pay is involved such as political offices and tech jobs. Collins or many women who would cheer her chastizing of manual labor workers on, wouldn’t be caught dead on an oil rig.

In light of this fact, feminists like Collins aren’t concerned about the lack of sexual diversity on a construction site, but rather the optics of no women being there that disturbs them. That men might dominate anything is too much to allow, thus Collins is going to make an example of men on Twitter while simultaneously virtue signaling as loud as possible.