The left has done some pretty outrageous things in order to hinder the success of the recently released Unplanned movie surrounding the true story of Abby Johnson’s transformation from a Planned Parenthood director to a pro-life activist after witnessing an abortion at 13 weeks.

The latest, and possibly laziest attempt, is attempting to convince people that the movie may result in terrorism.

Writing for The Cut, Caitlin Moscatello penned an article titled “Unplanned Is a Movie That Could Get Someone Killed,” wherein Moscatello attempts to reason that the movie may lead some to radicalize against the abortion industry, which may lead to deadly violence.

Moscatello first attempts to paint anti-abortion protesters who pray in front of abortion clinics as — and I’m not kidding — “sanitized harassment.” This, after attempting to tell its audience that an abortion wouldn’t bother a fetus since it doesn’t feel pain until it’s 24th week of gestation.

Moscatello’s facts are out of date, and while it’s still unclear what a baby feels at 13 weeks, we now know it can begin feeling pain as early as 15.

After sneering in type at the movie some more with social justice laden sexism and racism in tow, Moscatello finally gets around to making her point. The movie gets its message across well…in fact, maybe too well. As a result, people may be taken in by the movie and resort to terrorism.

Moscatello points to a scene involving the off-screen death of abortionist George Tiller who was shot and killed by an anti-abortion radical and attempts to sell the reader that the movie could create more killers thanks to messaging from right-leaning figures like Rush Limbaugh or Bill O’Reilly, which she blames for any violence against abortionists.

“It is films like Unplanned that could get more people killed,” wrote Moscatello.

Tiller notes there are hundreds of Planned Parenthood locations, but it only takes one of the hundreds of thousands who have watched Unplanned to do violence.

“There are currently 357 Planned Parenthood health centers that provide abortions in the U.S., and already, hundreds of thousands of people have viewed Unplanned,” wrote Moscatello. “It would only take one of them to create a real-life tragedy.”

Moscatello then noted her time in the theatre watching the movie herself alongside those who came to see the movie due to their agreement with the message. She notes that a woman nodding along to the message of the film, and one man raising his hands in the air near the end (a typical Christian sign of worship and prayer) gave her a feeling that she was “witnessing something scary,” and then proceeded to notice how normal everyone looked when the lights came on:

Toward the end of Unplanned, Johnson’s character tells members of the coalition that in her eight years at Planned Parenthood, she had seen lots of women drive away when they saw protesters praying outside the clinic. “It works,” she says to the other characters, but really, the audience. The message is as subtle as an infomercial: Take to the clinics. It works. In the theater I was in, a woman with white hair nodded and a man in the third row raised his arms up to the ceiling, and I couldn’t shake the feeling that I was witnessing something scary.

Then the lights came on, and everyone looked perfectly nice.

This is astounding bigotry on Moscatello’s part, and painting normal, everyday Americans as dangerous, because they agreed with a film that killing babies is bad, says a lot more about her than it does the movie, right-leaning opinion, or the pro-life movement.

If she wants to see radicalization as a result of propaganda, then I can point to a boatload of left-leaning criminals who engaged in violence both in the past and the present that Moscatello would likely not like to answer for, or at least make excuses about.

Perhaps she would like to discuss the multitude of shooters who were registered Democrats or the consistent violence of Antifa?

I also wonder if Moscatello’s concerns for violence causing propaganda extends to Democrat politicians encouraging literal confrontation in the streets, which their supporters did, by the way. In fact, some people can’t step outside wearing a MAGA hat without running into an assault or threat of some form.

Going through Moscatello’s articles on The Cut, I’m not seeing much from her addressing these things, and I doubt we ever will.