As I sat down to listen to my pastor speak during an outdoor Easter service where I couldn’t have asked for more perfect weather, I tried to push back an uneasiness in the back of my head. Gathered around me was a large group of Christians, all sitting in one place. If an attack happened, unless a miracle by God intervened, people would die.

I thought about that because just earlier I had read about the bombing of a Christian church in Sri Lanka while they celebrated Easter Sunday. I noticed the various police officers patrolling around the park on foot where the service was being held, and wondered if our own church had that very same worry.

But I didn’t look at the news about it — not because I would become sad or angry about the attack — I was — but because if I began perusing the responses about it from various politicians and leaders, then I would have to confront the emotion of despondency.

It’s a feeling that the world I live in is far darker than attacks by a radicalized enemy, but that the people in our very own country, who share citizenship with me and who have platforms that many pay attention to, would treat it as a shrug-worthy event.

As Streiff covered on Sunday, leftist activists and politicians either sneered or feigned care about Christians being slaughtered.

Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, and others did everything in their power to dance around what group was killed, who did the killing, and even what Easter was about in tweets released to the public. Many of them went so far as to not even mention the word “Christian,” instead, calling them “Easter worshipers.”

When it came to the Democratic 2020 candidates, it wasn’t much better.

Even worse was the stark silence from some of our leaders about the atrocity.

Only Robert “Beto” O’Rourke and Andrew Yang posted any mention of the word “Christian” in their messages.

We know who was killed or injured, and it was Christians by the hundreds. We know who carried out the attack, it was a radical Muslim group. Yet, as Mike Ford wrote, the left is absolutely mum about pointing this out.

Yet when the Christchurch shooting happened, the left was tripping over themselves to name both the victims (Muslims) and the attacker (white supremacist). If there was a physical line for it, leftists would have been pushing one another out of the way in order to make a show of standing against white supremacy and Islamaphobia.

We live in an era where bigotry, racism, and sexism are acceptable, only the prejudices have turned against those who are perceived to be the most benefited members of our society. If you’re white, male, Jewish, Christian, straight, you seem to matter less.

You matter less to the point where the slaughter of one of these groups can occur and politicians will treat it with far less concern than if it had happened to people from the LGBT community, Muslim communities, or abortion providers.

We know that because we’ve seen it demonstrated.

However, the most hated of the hated is Christianity.

We’ve watched as Democrats booed God during their Democratic National Convention. They’ve attempted to twist Christ’s words in order to push late-term abortion, relentlessly attacked Christian students for something they didn’t do, and force Christians to operate their own businesses against their religious morals while remaining silent on businesses run by Muslims for the exact same thing.

Even DNC Chair Tom Perez managed to cast shade on “the pulpit” as a reason the Democrats have a problem with voters.

The instances of bigoted behavior against Christians are far more numerous than the few I’ve listed here, and we as a society have likely forgotten many more due to the fact that politicians and our media tend to wipe it from their minds within 48 hours of the occurrence, and will hardly bring it up again.

Christianity is the enemy of the leftist agenda. It stands diametrically opposed to the leftist agenda, and that becomes more and more apparent as the Democrat party leans more toward radicalism.

The sad part is that the attacks on Christians are numerous, and as our leaders turn their backs on those who worship Christ, the attacks may only increase. Republicans won’t stay in office forever. Populations shift as they’re doing in Texas, or the law of undulation may take effect in the country as a whole. No matter how you swing it, at some point, those who couldn’t care less about Christians will take power.

When the attacks come and more Christians die, we’ll watch as our uncaring Democrat politicians and leaders do little to nothing in the wake of it, all thanks to their bigotry.