It would take hours to list all the reasons that the idea of “red flag laws” are a bad one, but as actor Adam Baldwin highlighted in his response to the ravings of an anti-gun activist, chief among them is the idea that someone else can take your right to a gun away because they don’t like you.

Fred Guttenberg is one of the dads who lost a child during the Parkland shooting. While we should definitely feel for him and understand his anger, Guttenberg has embraced some of the more radical leftist stances, including activism that plays into agenda points from the left like helping to try to bring down Brett Kavanaugh back when he was a Supreme Court nominee.

This has earned Guttenberg some chastising from other Parkland parents, namely Andrew Pollack, who also lost a son.

Guttenberg attacked Baldwin on Wednesday, saying the actor may be “off his meds,” and is displaying “pure levels of crazy.”

“Just an assumption, but maybe he should not have access to guns,” tweeted Guttenberg.

Baldwin didn’t take it lying down and used Guttenberg’s tweet as a teachable moment about how dangerous red flag laws can be.

“In which Fred’s clumsy punitive psychiatry from afar demonstrates the true fascistic nature of the modern gun-grabber and the dangers to civil rights posed by potential “Red Flag” laws,” tweeted Baldwin.

Baldwin is right on the money here. What Guttenberg is doing is showing you how someone with a dislike of someone else can simply suggest mental instability and attempt to use that to strip away someone’s rights.

This is the inherent danger of red flag laws. It works more in line with the Salem witch trials than it does any kind of judicial standard we have in America. Someone with a score to settle, or even someone in the midst of an emotional moment, may do something that may complicated the life of an innocent person.

Guttenberg, an avowed anti-gun activist, is already showing that he’s willing and ready to insinuate someone is crazy and shouldn’t have guns strictly because Baldwin takes a pro-gun position and speaks out against narratives like the kind Guttenberg creates.

The wise move here is to never institute a policy as reckless as a red flag law.

(h/t: Twitchy)