If you’ve ever been to Texas during the summertime, you find out one thing pretty quick.

It’s hot here. It’s not just hot, it’s humid and hot. The devil spends his summers in hell because it’s cooler there.

The left is apparently just discovering how hot Texas can be. After many of them migrated here from places like California and New York, the heat must be a real shock to them. If they just asked a native, like yours truly, if this is a typical thing I would have been able to inform them that the Texas heat is a feature, not a bug.

But, the left being the left, they felt the heat and immediately began panicking about climate change.

Bloomberg Opinion author Justin Fox wrote out an article detailing the fact that in Arlington, Texas, the Rangers are building a new stadium with air conditioning and a retractable roof. The reasoning behind this, Fox found, was because the Rangers found that the heat was making people shrug off going to games.

And the heat is there because of climate change. He then points to a graph that showed that Dallas weather has been getting hotter since the 1940s. While it does show spikes here and there, the main spike was in 2011, and after the weather actually subsequently cooler.

He doesn’t talk about it, but the 2011 spike in temperature was part of a heatwave experienced in North America, of which Dallas was affected with heat that averaged eight degrees higher. It was a freak moment in the weather, but freak moments in the weather are more common than people think, apparently including Fox. Not everyone in American suffered from the heatwave. Some places even reported having colder than normal summers that year.

The weather can be weird and unpredictable. Ask any meteorologist.

The truth is that sitting outside in the midst of a Texas summer sucks whether there’s a heatwave or not and an air-conditioned building with a retractable roof is a trend that is already going in Texas. The Houston Astros abandoned the Astrodome for the more high-tech field of Minute Maid Park. Right next door to the Ranger’s field in Arlington — and I’m not exaggerating about that — is AT&T Stadium, the home of the Dallas Cowboys, which is also an indoor stadium with a retractable roof and glorious A/C to combat that Texas heat.

The AT&T stadium opened in 2009, and wouldn’t ya know it, the comfortable facilities spiked attendance and kept the people coming back.

If I was the Rangers, I’d be looking at that and thinking I’d want to get in on that kind of attendance with all the ticket sales, food and drink, and merch sales that go along with it.

And that’s the exact point Ted Cruz made to Chris Hayes when Hayes decided to start panicking about climate change thanks to aforementioned Bloomberg article. While Hayes was trumpeting climate change, Cruz made with the logic.

“Uh, to sell baseball tickets? Breaking news: Texas is hot in the summertime. Always has been,” tweeted Cruz. “Google this thing called “the Astrodome.” When that was built—in 1965–it was nearly a decade before Time ran their (now discredited) cover story, “Another Ice Age?”

As a Dallas resident, I spend a good bit of time in Arlington. It’s a fun place to be with waterparks, Six Flags, and sports as far as the eye can see. I love live sporting events the most and I’m watching the Cowboys on their home field every chance I get. One thing I’ve done only once is attend a Rangers game.

Why? Because like everyone else, I hate the Texas heat in the dead of summer. I have ever since I was a child. This really puts a damper on my willingness to see the Rangers play live, which I’d love to do more often. This new stadium would really inspire me to go way more often.

Cruz is literally right on the money, but the weird part is that it doesn’t take that much brainpower to make the connection between wanting to sell tickets and providing more comfortable facilities for the people you’re trying to get through your doors. AT&T Stadium is proof that it works.

A chart showing a pretty standard flow of heat in Texas with a few spikes here and there doesn’t mean that the world is going to end, it means weather sometimes changes in uncomfortable ways.

Now give it a rest, Chicken Littles. I want to watch baseball in peace.