If there’s one thing I love about people who virtue signal, it’s that when it comes time to practice what they preach, they suddenly have excuses as to why they don’t practice the virtues about which they’ve been preaching to you.

Take, for instance, the good people of Sweden. The country leans so heavily left that it’s fallen over into the muck of its own making. It’s welcomed in refugees from the middle east, and as a result, has seen a spiking crime and rape epidemic that nabbed it the title of “rape capital of the west.”

Instead of helping the people of its country, the Swedish government went about covering up its rape statistics. What’s more, the Swedish people are seemingly proud of their newfound troubles and are outwardly welcoming to the refugees.

Outwardly being the keyword here.

Recently, a small group set out to get the reactions of Swedes when asked if they would be willing to take refugees in themselves. Every person in the video answered they would.

They were likely feeling pretty proud of themselves as they answered the question, but then the video makers suddenly put their convictions to the test as the Swedes were then presented with a migrant they could take in. A grown man named “Ali,” who needed a place to live.

Naturally, the people who were so welcoming just moments ago began desperately searching any excuse in the book to not have to take in the migrant and all their talk about helping those in need looked oh so foolish.

It makes you wonder what kind of society we’d be living in if people were just more honest with themselves and others about their beliefs. If Swedes would just stand up and say that they’re not into the idea of refugees living in their homes because of the fact that they know it may invite all sorts of troubles, then perhaps Sweden would be a country much lower in crime and rape.

But this simple video just unveiled the truth about virtue signaling. It’s many people creating problems for others that they themselves wouldn’t take on. This video may have taken place in Sweden, but it’s a principle that applies to everyone.