Hillary Clinton points to the audience as she is introduced at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., Friday, May 25, 2018. Harvard University’s Radcliffe Institute honored Clinton with the 2018 Radcliffe Medal. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

A lot of ridiculous things have come out of the Democratic party as of late, but here’s one for the books. It would appear that failed 2016 presidential candidate Hillary Clinton — who lost to President Donald Trump, mind you — is tied with former VP Joe Biden as the top pick to run against Trump.

Because if at first, you don’t succeed, try, try, try, try, try, try, again?

According to a Harvard-Harris national poll, Clinton is once again sitting above Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, which will be a nasty replay of events for Democrats, and not by a small margin either.

Democrat voters responded to the question “Which of the following candidates are you most likely to vote for in a Democratic primary?” with answers that gave Biden a 33 percent lead with Sanders trailing at 18 percent. Pretty standard fair like we’ve seen so far, but then Harvard-Harris changed it up and threw a few theoretical candidates in there such as Clinton and Michael Bloomberg.

With these new options, the vote changes pretty dramatically. Biden still holds the lead, but now at 19 percent. Clinton comes in at a virtual tie with 18 percent. Sanders drops to 12 percent.

When Independent voters are added to this mix, Biden and Clinton’s lead evens out at 13 percent each.

It’s a bit late in the game, but if these poll numbers are any indication as to how Clinton would be received should she reenter the ring, then for many Democratic voters, late is better than never. They may get their wish, too. Rumors of a rematch between Clinton and Trump have been floating around the media for weeks.

According to some insiders, the rumors are more than rumors and she plans on jumping in soon.

(READ: Former Clinton Adviser Says Hillary Is Running, She’s Just Waiting On One Thing)

Regardless, if she runs again, there’s a very good reason to believe that the outcome will be pretty much the same as 2016, possibly with even less support for Clinton this time around. None of the problems that plagued her in 2016 have gone away; they have likely only gotten worse. Be it her health or her past of shady corruption.

What’s more, she’d have to deal with the momentum Trump has accumulated since becoming president. His economy is very strong, and historically, a president with a strong economy is incredibly difficult to push out of office. Experts have even already called the election for Trump strictly based off of his economy alone.

(READ: Economic Experts See Trump Walking Away With Easy 2020 Victory)

Then, there are other problems to consider. Clinton’s reintroduction into the race may tick off more than a few Sanders voters who no doubt still incredibly salty with the way Sanders was cheated by Clinton and the DNC in 2016. It’s unclear how many people would abandon the Democrat ship should she achieve the primary nomination, but it’ll doubtless be enough to tip the scales.

All in all, Clinton’s support is theoretical, and if she actually enters the substantiality may be far different. What we may be seeing right now is a lot of wishful thinking by Democrats who are ultimately unimpressed with the current crop of 2020 candidates.

(h/t: Daily Wire)