Seton Motley | Red State | RedState.com

I despise, with all my body and soul, feuding with fellow conservatives. I realize that politics brings out a serious passion for people, including myself. We all have an idea of what a free and good society should look like.

The “good” part of the societal concern is where we tend to part the most, and now-President Donald Trump caused a pretty big rift about that between conservatives when he was then-candidate Donald Trump.

If you go back over my writing in 2015 and 2016, you’d have seen a man who rejected Trump completely. I was desperate for an alternative. I backed Rubio and Cruz, I tried to back Gary Johnson but the stupidity of that idea was made apparent pretty quickly, and I even looked into Ed McMullen for a time. Like many, I didn’t like Trump’s attitude, his outlook on life, and had no confidence in his ability to lead. He had been divisive, and I felt he had lowered the intelligence level in the room by so much that I couldn’t see how the party that I had felt was the intelligent and wise group in the room could get on board with him.

I considered myself “Never Trump,” and wrote openly about how much I didn’t like him. “Let the Republican party burn to the ground,” I said during a television interview.

All the while, I found myself feuding with friends, colleagues, and family members. For someone who hates it so much your allies become your enemies, the 2016 election period was not a fun time.

When Trump won his victory over Hillary Clinton, I was surprised to find myself having dual thoughts. On the one hand, I was upset that Trump had won over someone like Cruz or Rubio. On the other, I was thrilled that Clinton didn’t win. I wrote that now that Trump was President, the fairminded thing to do is not rant, rage, and rail over the fact that my guy didn’t win, it would be to praise him when he deserved it and lambast the hell out of him when he deserved that too.

I can tell you now, that I was never so thrilled to be wrong. Trump isn’t the perfect president, but he’s definitely doing something good, and that deserves to be recognized. What’s more, as events have played out, I’m more thrilled on the daily that we got Trump instead of Clinton. No matter how the election would have played out, the left would have considered radicalism a good thing and I shudder to think where we’d be today if it wasn’t for Trump’s victory.

And here’s where I get confused about the people who still consider themselves “Never Trump.”

I’m not saying you have to like Trump, but I’m looking at a few factors and wondering what the point of it is.

For one. There is no “Never Trump” now. We have Trump. If you’re calling yourself “Never Trump” at this point, doesn’t that mean that no matter what he does, you’re going to resist him? At a time when we’ve got literal socialist radicals tearing up the Washington scene, are we going to naysay everything he does that disrupts them? Is the goal to give them the high ground to spite Trump?

I’m not saying that you have to back everything he does by a long shot. I don’t, but I certainly think that it’s necessary to back him when what he’s doing really is in the best interest of the country based on our professed principles.

Come 2020, will this same attitude be around?

I think it’s pretty clear that the majority of the right, be it conservative or libertarian, will be there to back Trump when it comes time to pull the lever. You should pull the lever for who you think is going to do the best job. Full stop.

However, if you’re looking at the accomplishments of Trump and how he’s improved the economy so much. If you’re weighing how he’s handled one of the most destructive lawmakers the Democrat party has ever put forth. If you’re looking at how the media has never been so exposed and it centers around the fact that he can bring their true nature out with something as small as a tweet.

I think the answer is clear. Trump is the best choice. Not the only choice, but the best choice.

Not voting for him purely out of spite isn’t going to help anyone, especially the country. Not voting for him because you think someone is better is perfectly legitimate, but not out of spite. You and I both know the alternative is a goof in front of a pack of raging lunatics who consider Marx to be too light of touch.

I don’t want to fight with my fellow conservatives, but I think this election year I find myself on the opposite side. The less of you I have to fight the better, not just for me, but for the country.

Brandon Morse
Senior Editor. Culture critic, and video creator. Good at bad photoshops.
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