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Rep. Dan Crenshaw, R-Texas, left, listens as Office of Management and Budget Acting Director Russell Vought testifies before the House Budget Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 12, 2019, during a hearing on the fiscal year 2020 budget. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Twitter’s undeniable bias jumped twenty sharks on Tuesday after it censored President Donald Trump for a tweet it considered in violation of its harassment/intent to harm policies and Texas Republican Congressman Dan Crenshaw has made one of the more accurate observations about the state of Twitter.

What did Trump say that was so awful? He said he’d enforce the law.

“There will never be an ‘Autonomous Zone’ in Washington, D.C., as long as I’m your President. If they try they will be met with serious force!” Trump tweeted on Tuesday morning.

Twitter, a publisher masquerading as a platform, censored the tweet, and Twitter safety soon explained why they did what they did.

“We’ve placed a public interest notice on this Tweet for violating our policy against abusive behavior, specifically, the presence of a threat of harm against an identifiable group,” said the council.

The “identifiable group” that Twitter is nebulously referring to is a group of rioters who attempted and failed to bring down the statue of Andrew Jackson, then proceeded to attempt to conduct a hostile takeover of Lafayette Square at the St. John’s church. They nicknamed it “BHAZ” or the Black House Autonomous Zone.

Clever.

These actions were clearly illegal, not to mention capable of setting a dangerous precedent for future rioters should it be allowed. Trump’s promise to clear them out with force was the right thing to do, yet Twitter seemed to disagree. According to the social media network, enforcing the law against criminals is a “threat of harm.”

Whose side is Twitter on? Crenshaw made it clear in his own tweet.

“This is beyond the pale. The mob has infiltrated every corner of society. The President’s tweet is not only appropriate but also necessary. Every mayor who claims to protect their citizens should repeat the same. Violent anarchists cannot be encouraged,” tweeted Crenshaw.

In other words, the very mob that Trump is enforcing the law against is the same mob that is currently running the safety councils on Twitter. Is he being sensationalistic? Hyperbolic?

Not really.

Since its inception, Twitter’s “safety” experts have been a who’s who list of leftist organizations and special interest groups. There has been a clear bias against the right that has seen a slew of conservative users suspended or banned for next to no reason at all. The latest was Carpe Donktum, famously known as Trump’s favorite meme maker.

Donktum has received a permanent suspension from Twitter over what Twitter claims is a DMCA violation, yet Donktum has made it clear that he has always complied with Twitter’s rules.

“It doesn’t matter,” wrote Donktum in a statement. “I have been banned for being effective and they won’t even look me in the eye as they do it.”

While it’s unconfirmed that any of Twitter’s actual staff has participated in the riots (I say unconfirmed because I honestly can’t rule it out), Crenshaw’s point is a solid one. Twitter has chosen its side and it’s not on the side of law and order. It actively is trying to censor the call for law and order. It is currently part of the very mob that Trump was trying to stop.

Judging by the constant pattern of Twitter giving a much easier time to the left, its constant actions against Trump, etc., it’s not a stretch to believe that there is some kind of effort by Twitter’s employees to help in a culture war. If I’m wrong, then I have yet to see anything showing me that I am, while a myriad of evidence piles up telling me the opposite daily.

Brandon Morse
Senior Editor. Culture critic, and video creator. Good at bad photoshops.
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