Corporations Boycott Facebook - AP featured image
FILE – In this March 29, 2018, file photo, the logo for Facebook appears on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite in New York’s Times Square. Facebook says it recently discovered a security breach affecting nearly 50 million user accounts.
The hack is the latest setback for Facebook during a year of tumult for the global social media service. In a blog post , Friday, Sept. 28, the company says hackers exploited its “View As” feature, which lets people see what their profiles look like to someone else (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

Corporations got together to provide a massive virtue signal by agreeing to boycott Facebook. According to the agreement put together by left-wing groups such as the NAACP and the Anti-Defamation League, corporations would cease advertising on Facebook in response to Facebook allegedly allowing hate speech on its platform.

They called it the #StopHateForProfit campaign. Many corporations caved to the pressure and announced that they would be pausing advertising on Facebook. This included Coca-Cola, Adidas, Nike, Starbucks, and more.

What do they consider hate speech?

Many things said by President Donald Trump for one. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg refused to take down posts by Trump. There is also complaints that they allowed the right-leaning Daily Caller to be a fact-checker.

However, corporations are continuing to prove that they don’t really care about social causes, they just care about making money and pretending to care about whatever cause they’re demanded to care about in order to keep their bottom line intact.

As the Washington Free Beacon reported, various companies are still advertising on Russia’s social media network “VK.” Why is this bad? Because VK gives a platform to actual hate groups, not just people and organizations the left labels as “hate groups”:

But many of these companies—including Coca-Cola, Pepsi, Adidas, and Reebok—have been regular advertisers on VK, a popular Russian media website used by many white supremacists and neo-Nazis who have been banned from Facebook. Several of these companies continue to have a marketing presence on the Russian website, raising questions about their recent concern about “hate speech” on social media sites.

VK’s popularity among white supremacists and neo-Nazis has been documented for years by media outlets and watchdog groups.

Even as they remain mum on VK’s laissez-faire attitude toward online hate speech, major companies have pulled ads from Facebook for not policing speech on its own site.

The list of corporations still advertising on VK while they release statements supporting the boycott and preaching about hate include…:

Many of the companies that joined the Facebook boycott continue to market their products and brands in posts on their VK pages, including Starbucks, Ford, Unilever, Colgate, Vans, The North Face, and Patagonia. On July 2, two days after joining the Facebook ad boycott, Colgate ran a promotion on VK offering prizes to members who purchased its products and used the VK app to scan the product code.

Coca-Cola has run advertising campaigns on VK, including a controversial 2016 ad in which the company included the disputed territories of Crimea and the Kuril Islands on a map of Russia. Pepsi has also been an advertiser on the site and reportedly collaborated with VK on a payment app in 2018. Both still have an active presence on the platform.

It needs to be understood that these corporations don’t really care about the causes they glob onto. Not generally anyway. As I’ve explained in greater detail, many corporations are simply looking for easy PR points and virtue signaling is an easy way to go about getting them.

(READ: Corporations are Here to Make Money, and Don’t Really Support Your Cause)

Very rarely does a corporation actually believe in the socio-political pose it strikes. If it really did have a principle outside of making money, it would carry that principle with them from one country to another. A perfect example is the gaming company Bethesda, which made the cliche move of making its Twitter avatars rainbow-colored for pride month…except in the countries where being gay is still very frowned upon.

 

Brandon Morse
Senior Editor. Culture critic, and video creator. Good at bad photoshops.
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