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FILE – In this file photograph taken Nov. 1, 2007, the masthead of The Washington Post is displayed on the office building, in Washington. The Washington Post Co. is reporting a surge in second-quarter earnings, helped by a big jump in profits at its education division and lower expenses. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)

The Washington Post makes it no secret that it’s not a fan of President Donald Trump, but it turns out that it also has a foreign financial incentive not to. Moreover, it’s actively publishing content paid for by our enemy, the Chinese Communist government, and making that content look like regular articles.

On Tuesday, the Washington Post published an article titled “Trump views China’s Communist Party as a threat. Young Chinse see it as a ticket to a better future.”

In it, going to see the carving of Chairman Mao is talked about pleasantly and even excitedly. It also claims that those who spoke out against the party during the height of the Coronavirus are now pleased when they look back on how the party handled the situation. They interview one girl who expresses her glowing pride in the party:

Chinese who were complaining in February about the party’s coronavirus coverup reflect more positively on their experience now that they can see, through the American example, how much worse it could have been.

“It’s strange to think of the Communist Party as weaker, because all of us feel that our country and our party have grown stronger in the face of this epidemic,” said Xia, who was dressed more like a pop star than a propaganda star. Like her father, she joined the party at age 20.

The Washington Post article moves on from the sunshine and flowers of the Communist party to the darkness that is Trump’s naysaying about it. A Chinese professor claims that Trump’s hatred of China is spurred by his jealousy and even fear of the party:

Wang Wei, a professor at the Hunan provincial branch of the Communist Party School, said Pompeo’s comments revealed the Trump administration’s worry about China eclipsing the United States.

“This just shows that they fear a stronger Communist Party and a stronger China after we showed our might in the battle against the coronavirus epidemic,” she said.

The article goes on to acknowledge that China’s Communist Party holds an iron grip on the people, doesn’t allow for any other political parties to exist and even heavily restricts internet access, but despite all of that, the Washington Post wants you to know that the youth of China are all about it. In fact, they see all this as indicative of a bright future:

But in China, the reality is more complicated. The party may remain bound by many of the strictures first envisaged by Mao and his comrades in the 1920s, and these pronouncements may hint at underlying alarm about the challenges China faces, but the organization is relevant to many people’s lives.

Party membership means better education prospects and better jobs, more politically advantageous marriages and nicer apartments. For many, it is a ticket to a brighter future.

“If you want an important job, or even to work in a university or a social organization, if you’re not a party member, you won’t be promoted,” said Zheng Yongnian, a Chinese political scientist who teaches at the National University of Singapore. “Plus, young people these days are quite nationalistic, so they are choosing to join the party.”

Some 80 percent of recruits last year were younger than 35, according to official party statistics.

I’ll spare you the rest of the article’s details but it goes on to say that the CCP’s leader has made joining the party more of an exclusive club that only the best and most loyal can get into. Being a CCP member gets you many benefits and that many kids are joining up in order to help lead the party to a better future.

The CCP’s past sins are glossed over in favor of a picture painted that makes it seem like the CCP is a government that knows exactly what it’s doing at all times and the future under said leadership is bright.

If it sounds like the Washington Post is feeding you Chinese propaganda here, it’s because it very likely is.

According to a June article in the Daily Caller, the Washington Post is getting millions of dollars from Beijing in order to post “articles” that are made to look like news but are, in reality, propaganda pieces that make the CCP look like heroes:

China Daily, an English-language newspaper controlled by the Chinese Communist Party, has paid more than $4.6 million to The Washington Post and nearly $6 million to The Wall Street Journal since November 2016, the records show.

Both newspapers have published paid supplements that China Daily produces called “China Watch.” The inserts are designed to look like real news articles, though they often contain a pro-Beijing spin on contemporary news events.

A couple of fascinating things about this article…

For one, it popped up at a time when Trump’s battle against communist China is reaching a fever pitch. Some friendly press to make it seem like Trump is making one more mistake only helps the CCP.

Secondly, communism has created more internal strife in America than ever before thanks to open calls for communism to topple our capitalist system coming from members of the hard left, be they Antifa members or elected members of congress.

Nothing in the article details that it’s been paid for by grants from the Chinese government but it’s hard not to draw that conclusion. This Washington Post article is so riddled with adoration that its criticisms of the party come off as masked attempts to make it seem neutral. The criticisms are dismissed as quickly as they come and the picture you’re painted is one of great competence and enthusiasm regarding the CCP.

Regardless of whether or not this particular article was commissioned by the CCP, the Washington Post has no real incentive to speak ill of the communists seeing as how they’re taking so much money from them.

 

Brandon Morse
Senior Editor. Culture critic, and video creator. Good at bad photoshops.
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