FILE – This July 27, 2006 arrest file photo made available by the Palm Beach, Fla., Sheriff’s Office shows Jeffrey Epstein. Epstein, a wealthy financier and convicted sex offender, has been arrested in New York on sex trafficking charges. Two law enforcement officials said Epstein was taken into federal custody Saturday, July 6, 2019, on charges involving sex-trafficking allegations that date to the 2000s. (AP Photo/Palm Beach Sheriff’s Office, File)

On Wednesday, the New York Times published a lengthy article written by three writers which offers a glimpse into the world of sex offender Jeffrey Epstein. The trio interviewed over a dozen of Epstein’s acquaintances to gather material for this story. And they paint a picture of an unusual man with some very unconventional interests.

In addition to his enormous brownstone in Manhattan, his Palm Beach mansion, his private island in the Caribbean, Epstein owns a 33,000-square-foot ranch located just outside of Santa Fe, New Mexico. It was here, he told friends, that he wanted women “to be impregnated with his sperm and to give birth to his babies” – 20 at a time.

According to the article, not only did Epstein like to surround himself with beautiful women, but with brilliant scientists. He actively cultvated friendships with many distinguished physicists, researchers, doctors and engineers. This group included:

Nobel Prize-winning physicist Murray Gell-Mann, who discovered the quark; the theoretical physicist and best-selling author Stephen Hawking; the paleontologist and evolutionary biologist Stephen Jay Gould; Oliver Sacks, the neurologist and best-selling author; George M. Church, a molecular engineer who has worked to identify genes that could be altered to create superior humans; and the M.I.T. theoretical physicist Frank Wilczek, a Nobel laureate.

He was especially interested in transhumanism which is “the science of improving the human population through technologies like genetic engineering and artificial intelligence. Critics have likened transhumanism to a modern-day version of eugenics, the discredited field of improving the human race through controlled breeding.”

Another of his acquaintances told the writers that Epstein was fascinated by cryonics which is “an unproven science in which people’s bodies are frozen to be brought back to life in the future. Epstein told this person that he wanted his head and penis to be frozen.”

The writers spoke to several of the scientists whom Epstein had been involved with. They were told that the “lure was Mr. Epstein’s money…The prospect of financing blinded them to the seriousness of his sexual transgressions.”

Here’s how this mad man entertained his scientist friends:

Scientists gathered at dinner parties at Mr. Epstein’s Manhattan mansion, where Dom Pérignon and expensive wines flowed freely, even though Mr. Epstein did not drink. He hosted buffet lunches at Harvard’s Program for Evolutionary Dynamics, which he had helped start with a $6.5 million donation.

Others flew to conferences sponsored by Mr. Epstein in the United States Virgin Islands and were feted on his private island there. Once, the scientists — including Mr. Hawking — crowded on board a submarine that Mr. Epstein had chartered.

Epstein had allegedly once told a NASA scientist about his idea for the baby ranch. This man said:

Mr. Epstein had based his idea for a baby ranch on accounts of the Repository for Germinal Choice, which was to be stocked with the sperm of Nobel laureates who wanted to strengthen the human gene pool. (Only one Nobel Prize winner has acknowledged contributing sperm to it. The repository discontinued operations in 1999.)

He said he had the impression that Mr. Epstein was using the dinner parties — where some guests were attractive women with impressive academic credentials — to screen candidates to bear Mr. Epstein’s children.

Such was the high life of accused sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein. His money bought him friends, women, the company of renowned scholars, and for a long time, his freedom. Let’s see if it helps him now.

A strange man with even stranger interests.

Read the full article here.