AP featured image
FBI Deputy Assistant Director Peter Strzok testifies before the House Committees on the Judiciary and Oversight and Government Reform during a hearing on “Oversight of FBI and DOJ Actions Surrounding the 2016 Election,” on Capitol Hill, Thursday, July 12, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

 

Undercover Huber presents text messages exchanged between FBI agent Peter Strzok and FBI lawyer Lisa Page on February 10, 2017 between the hours of 5:02 pm and 10:37 pm, which were previously released. Next to them, he shows some “just released” texts from 5:37 pm to 10:11 pm on the same date.

Hmmm. Same date. Same time frame. Same subject.

Undercover asks why the ones on the right were hidden until a U.S. Attorney had to bust in and drag them out?

There is zero chance some FBI grunt is selectively pruning individual texts like this on their own initiative, especially after all the so called bad apples already left or got fired. I’m smelling watergate level cover up here. What else is being hidden?

UPDATE: The best explanation I’ve seen in some smart replies is that some of these are cell phone messages, but the others are Microsoft Lync messages.

Okay that may explain why they weren’t released to the public, but it doesn’t explain suppressing them to @SidneyPowell1 who asked for *all Brady material*, which would include text messages, but also Lync chats as well as emails, electronic documents, handwritten notes etc.

It also doesn’t explain why none of this material was turned over to Congressional investigators either.

Prior to the bombshell news in the Michael Flynn case over the last ten days, a large part of (his attorney) Sidney Powell’s case against the FBI involved the alleged mishandling, editing, and tampering with the 302 report from the FBI’s January 24, 2017 ambush interview. Strzok and Page are discussing their “edits” to the original 302 and the language is more explicit in the newly released texts. And it becomes instantly clear why they were not disclosed along with the first group.

A quick glance at the messages on the right shows why they are a tad more incriminating than those on the left.

And it has nothing to do with Page’s disagreeable mood.

She is annoyed about Strzok’s edits of the Flynn 302.

He tells her, “Lisa, you didn’t see it before my edits that went into what I sent you. I was 1) trying to completely re-write the thing so as to save [redacted] voice and 2) get it out to you for general review and comment in anticipation of needing it soon. I greatly appreciate your time in reviewing and your edits. I incorporated them. Thank you.”

Over 2 1/2 weeks after Strzok and FBI agent Joe Pientka conducted their ill-intentioned interview of Gen. Michael Flynn, Page and Strzok are writing up the 302.

Typically, a 302 is written up within a day or two an interview when an agent’s memory is freshest.

Although the agent’s tampering with a 302 report seems almost beside the point after a top FBI official’s notes about how they would set a perjury trap for Flynn were exposed, it still remains an important part of the big picture. Even the fact that the FBI had culled these particular messages out of the group they planned to release is a story of its own.

Elizabeth Vaughn
Writer at RedState
MBA, former financial consultant, options trader
Mom of three grown children, grandmother
Email Elizabeth at [email protected]

 
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