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Demonstrators paint the words ‘defund the police’ as they protest Saturday, June 6, 2020, near the White House in Washington, over the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis. Floyd died after being restrained by Minneapolis police officers. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

 

For some utterly inexplicable reason, a young man, perhaps in his twenties, walks by a 92-year-old woman walking with the assistance of a push cart, and hits her on the head.

The woman falls to the ground, hitting her head on a fire hydrant on the way down.

This thug turns his head back briefly to see her collapsed on the ground and casually continues walking.

This incident was captured by a nearby security camera.

This senseless assault occurred on Friday afternoon in the Gramercy Park neighborhood of Manhattan.

ABC News reports that the woman was taken to a nearby hospital and is expected to recover.

But even if this perpetrator is caught by police and charged with assault, because of New York’s newly enacted cash bail reform legislation, he will be quickly released.

Perhaps if we’re going to live in a world without police, we ought to get used to this sort of sociopathic conduct.

Readers?

Updated on June 16, 3:25 pm;  The NYPD reports that the suspect, Rashid Brimmage, 31, is now in police custody. Eyewitness News 7 reports that Brimmage has “more than 100 prior arrests and was recognized by a police officer who had seen the surveillance video.”

The victim spoke to Eyewitness News 7 after the victim, a retired teacher, had left the hospital. For safety reasons, she chose not to use her full name. She said,  “I’m frightened to tears. I’m not going to walk there on my own, and it’s very upsetting. It’s very upsetting.”

“I thought it was a brick or something like that,” she told the reporter. “Hit me on the right scalp, on the right side of my head, and of course I fell down on the street. There were a couple of young women there. They helped me up. They said, ‘I’m going to call an ambulance.'”

“I’ve felt very safe in the city, and now, forget it. I’m afraid to go out,” she added.

 

Elizabeth Vaughn
Writer at RedState
MBA, former financial consultant, options trader
Mom of three grown children, grandmother
Email Elizabeth at [email protected]

 
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