The AFFORDABLE Care Act, right? Not so affordable for many. The bragging over the number of people covered is laughable since coverage is mandatory. It’s like bragging about more people wearing seatbelts while standing in front of a “Click It or Ticket” billboard.

Now comes word directly from the Obama administration that if you purchased your insurance plan through healthcare.gov, you’re in for a nasty surprise:

Naturally, this would be an issue that could and should be used against Hillary but Trump will likely be picking fights with somebody else while his supporters whine the media isn’t covering it.

UPDATE: This is not all of the bad news. The administration, is going to try via regulation, to change the law:

The insurance industry is fighting the Obama administration to overturn a new regulation it says could jeopardize health plans for millions of people.

The industry is lobbying Congress to take action against a proposed Obama administration regulation that would target fixed indemnity plans, which Congress has exempted from federal insurance requirements. The plans pay out a specific amount of money for a per-service, per-day benefit and are intended to offer a supplement for people in high-deductible plans, as they are cheap and pay out a fixed amount.

The plans are exempt from Obamacare’s minimum criteria on what healthcare plans should include. Fixed indemnity plans do not count as minimum essential coverage, meaning that buying only a fixed indemnity plan doesn’t allow a person to avoid the law’s individual mandate penalty for not having insurance.

About 49 million people are enrolled in the plans, which have an average cost of about $20 per week.

Sounds like yet another way to artificially boost “enrollment” so the administration can brag about enrollment numbers:

The administration is trying to regulate the plans “out of existence” so that people will turn to Obamacare’s exchanges because it is the “only option remaining,” said Joel White, president of the Council for Affordable Health Coverage, an industry group fighting the proposed rule.