AP featured image
House Republican Conference chair Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., flanked by Rep. Doug Collins, R-Georgia, the top Republican on the House Judiciary Committee, left, and House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy, D-Calif., criticizes House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and the Democrats for launching a formal impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump, at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

 

Is the Republican Party getting in touch with its feminine side? According to the data, it seems this might be the case. This year, over 200 female Republicans are running for the U.S. House of Representatives, breaking the previous record of 135, which was set a decade ago. 

The Daily Caller reported that “While 2018 brought a record number of women to Congress, only 13 in the House were Republican, prompting the party to actively recruit more women to run for office.” It appears their efforts paid off as more female candidates have decided to compete for seats in Congress. 

House Republican Conference Chair Rep. Liz Cheney chimed in on the lack of female representation in the Republican Party after the Democrats took control of the House during the 2018 midterm elections. “We need to do better at making sure that we’re helping and supporting Republican women as candidates,” she said during a conversation on NBC News.

Other conservative female candidates weighed in. Genevieve Collins, who is running for Congress in Texas, told Newsy, “My grandmother was the first woman ever elected to the Dallas City Council, and that was in 1957, so I have been around tribalizing women, and I think it’s disappointing to not see that reflected in the U.S. House of Representatives from a Republican woman’s perspective.”

She continued, “The fact that there’s only 13 Republican women means that our voices, our perspectives, and our experiences are not able to shape policy, and also really help move the needle down the line to really make an impact.”

As Newsy points out, “electing more women is about more than control of the House. It’s about countering the narrative that women are turning on the GOP under President Trump.” But it’s even more than that. The left has relied on false accusations of bigotry to smear the Republican Party. 

Typically, progressive media and the Democrats use charges of racism or homophobia against the right. However, one of the tactics they use that does not receive as much attention is labeling conservatives as sexist. To be fair, the GOP has not done a great job at elevating women in its ranks, but it appears this trend might be changing, and it is bigger than President Trump.

Perhaps this might be the start of the conservative movement widening its tent and reaching out to different groups of voters. Wooing female and minority voters is a crucial step for the Republican Party if it wants to remain relevant in the decades to come. 

 

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