Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., with his wife Jane O’Meara Sanders, arrives to speak to supporters at a primary night election rally in Manchester, N.H., Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2020. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

A quick rundown of the in-progress Super Tuesday dumpster fire voting experience sponsored by the Los Angeles County Registrar-Recorder County Clerk:

  • About 20 percent of the machines were not working Tuesday morning.
  • Registered voters (many of whom had their registration card with them) were not showing up in the voter file and were forced to vote a provisional ballot.
  • Entire precincts were forcing ALL voters to vote by provisional ballot due to “connectivity issues” with the e-pollbooks.
  • Lines are still 3.5 hours long at some places, including college campuses full of Bernie supporters, at 6:30 PM PST.
  • Some machines are changing the voter’s selected candidate numerous times.
  • Machine malfunctions in East LA, whose Latino residents are generally Bernie Sanders supporters, forced properly registered voters to cast provisional ballots for no reason.
  • Poll workers, who were not given proper training or supplies, became frazzled and yelled at voters that they should have voted before Election Day.

The problems started day one of early voting, as we reported. But the problems from March 1 forward mainly had to do with machine failure or “connectivity issues” forcing massive numbers of already-registered voters to cast provisional ballots. Bernie Sanders’ supporters have expressed a major lack of confidence that their provisional votes will be counted.

At the polling place on UCLA’s campus (gee, I wonder which candidate is most popular among college students?) only 9 out of 39 machines were working, leading to a more than 3-hour wait…

One activist and poll watcher noted that EVERYONE in that polling place was given a provisional ballot because the check-in machines direct them to do so even if they’re in the voter file. The tech guy can’t figure it out.

When Latinos in East Los Angeles (Sanders stronghold) went to a late night location to cast their votes, they too were forced to cast provisional ballots because the machines were malfunctioning.

But even if one could get the e-pollbook machine working, there’s no guarantee it would properly register one’s vote.

Brad Friedman, who was quoted in my earlier story about the multitude of ways in which the new systems could fail, called out the liberal clique media cheerleaders who put out puff pieces anticipating a glorious new experience.

Common Cause advised registered voters who were being told to vote a provisional ballot to make sure they receive a written explanation why and a method to check to see if the ballot was counted.

Let’s hope no one really wants these results from California for a few weeks. It might take that long to get it all worked out – and that’s before any challenges that might be filed.

Jennifer Van Laar
Jennifer Van Laar is Deputy Managing Editor at RedState and founded Save California PAC. Follow her work on Facebook and Twitter. Story tips: [email protected]

 
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