Fox News’ Harris Faulkner interviewed Florida state representative Jared Moskowitz (D) about the recent school shooting in Parkland, Florida. If the subject matter weren’t so tragic, Moskowitz’ impassioned use of the hackneyed and vague phrase “do something” would almost be funny.

In Democrat-speak “do something” typically means “advance our longstanding gun-control agenda now while people are emotional and unlikely to read the fine print or consider whether our something would have eve  prevented the shooting we’re now politicizing.”

In the background students from from Stoneman Douglas High School were boarding busses to Talahassee where they’ll be used as props for Moskowitz and others who demand that “something” be done. Faulkner opened the interview by asking what the feeling is among the students leaving for the state capitol.

The students are determined. They’re grieving. They’re angry. It’s the same mood I feel as someone from the area, someone who went to the high schools, and as a legislator.

(Dont forget, Harris, this interview is mostly about ME.)

I think they will find when they get to Talahassee that we have enough people on both sides of the aisle to do something when it comes to what happened at Marjory Stoneman-Douglas. The idea of doing nothing is not acceptable. It’s not acceptable to me. It’s not acceptable (potentially) to others across the aisle.

This is the Democrat idea of bipartisan outreach: pretending to think those across the aisle are smart enough to agree with you.

But if we give in the usual partisanship…

(In other words “not agreeing to all Democrat demands.”)

If we give in to the usual special interests…

(In other words “blame the NRA for everything bad anyone ever does with a gun.”)

…and we give in to the usual partisanship that takes place not just in Washington, DC but in Talahassee as well…

(See above.)

It’s possible we could leave with nothing.

As previously established, nothing is of course unacceptable to Mr. Moskowitz.

If one thinks Moskowitz isn’t looking forward to his opportunity to grandstand, one need only listen to his ridiculous call for legislators to literally resign if they don’t want to sign on to “doing something.”

Let me be clear to all 120 other legislators that I serve with. There is a letter of resignation that you can write at any time if you don’t want to be part of the process. It’s a one page, put your name on it, sign it, and get out of the way. Because we must do something for these students.

Earlier in the week when emotions were at their peak, Moskowitz actually predicted that they would do nothing instead of doing something.

After Moskowitz arrived and he met with the families waiting for details about their children, he said he began to realize what the families of the Pulse victims also knew: “My colleagues will do nothing.”

“We’ve seen this show before,’’ he said Thursday. “Now it’s in my hometown. While my 4-year-old son was learning to write his name in preschool, his teacher’s daughter was killed in the shooting. We live in the most powerful country in the world and we have failed our children.

“You know what is going to happen after this? Nothing,” he said. “Politicians need to look these parents in the face and say: We will do nothing.”

Moskowitz’ something/nothing rhetoric is strangely reminiscent of parody like something from Monty Python or Dana Carvey’s George Bush tripling down on “Stay the course, a thousand points of light…”

Here’s a crazy idea for Moskowitz: suggest some ideas for legislation or a course of action. I know that would cut into your demogoguing time but still, look into it.

Moskowitz reminds me of a pre-perversion Anthony Weiner or his fellow Florida-man Alan Grayson in that he seems like a guy who likes to talk tough and pick fights only because he’s reasonably sure no fight will actually take place. (If their rhetoric ever did provoke a potential pugilistic reaction, their first response would almost certainly be threatening a lawsuit.)

I’ve never heard of Moskowitz before today so maybe it’s just my personal bias against Democrats (and politicians in general) but my instincts tell me this guy is a first class weasel with no real answers. I think he he’d be perfectly happy to do nothing because then he could continue to use that to bludgeon political opponents who stand up for the second amendment.

I could be wrong, but when you have seven minutes to speak on television and you literally can’t establish anything other than that you support “doing something” and against “doing nothing” you don’t sound like a guy with solutions.