There are countless good people working at every level to reform the criminal justice system, and it isn’t just in the wake of horrific police shootings and even more horrific retaliation against police who had nothing to do with them. These efforts have been at both the local level and at all legislative levels, and many of them are both bipartisan AND good, strangely enough.

The bad reform comes in somewhere around the prosecutorial level, when people like Marilyn Mosby prefer to seek social justice rather than legal justice in the courts. And, Politico has a story out today on one big funder of more prosecutors like Mosby: George Soros.

The billionaire financier has channeled more than $3 million into seven local district-attorney campaigns in six states over the past year — a sum that exceeds the total spent on the 2016 presidential campaign by all but a handful of rival super-donors.

His money has supported African-American and Hispanic candidates for these powerful local roles, all of whom ran on platforms sharing major goals of Soros’, like reducing racial disparities in sentencing and directing some drug offenders to diversion programs instead of to trial. It is by far the most tangible action in a progressive push to find, prepare and finance criminal justice reform-oriented candidates for jobs that have been held by longtime incumbents and serve as pipelines to the federal courts — and it has inspired fury among opponents angry about the outside influence in local elections.

“The prosecutor exercises the greatest discretion and power in the system. It is so important,” said Andrea Dew Steele, president of Emerge America, a candidate-training organization for Democratic women. “There’s been a confluence of events in the past couple years and all of the sudden, the progressive community is waking up to this.”

Soros has spent on district attorney campaigns in Florida, Illinois, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Mexico and Texas through a network of state-level super PACs and a national “527” unlimited-money group, each named a variation on “Safety and Justice.” (Soros has also funded a federal super PAC with the same name.) Each organization received most of its money directly from Soros, according to public state and federal financial records, though some groups also got donations from nonprofits like the Civic Participation Action Fund, which gave to the Safety and Justice group in Illinois.

Soros, whose hands are in many left-wing cookie jars, sees that the Left has been winning at the Supreme Court, and has since shifted to local politics in an effort to start restructuring the very face of criminal justice from the bottom up.

Criminal justice reform as developed and implemented in Congress and legislatures across the states, while not perfect, is a better method of reform for all because it is, as mentioned earlier, largely bipartisan in nature. Recognizing the needs of constituents, those lawmakers are actually working to fix the problem. Taking control of the criminal justice system from the bottom up, however, does little more than advance one side’s agenda.

Soros’ plan is tactically sound. It’s a wise strategy for someone who wants to advance ideology over meaningful reform. It’s all flying under the radar, however, because people are more focused on the presidential race. The Left is notorious for using the courts rather than the legislative process, to advance their social agendas. It undermines the system set in place in the Constitution, and it poses a very big threat.