The creme de la creme of Hollywood, Washington D.C., and journalism are facing a string of sexual harassment and sexual assault allegations the likes of which we’ve never seen. As more and more women (and men!) come out and say what happened to them, more and more women feel more confident in sharing their stories.

It is not something limited to a party, nor is it limited to ideology. There is, however, one explanation – really, the only explanation – for why many of these people would commit the acts they commit.

We, as a nation, continue to pursue the idea that there is such thing as moral relativity.

Products of Hollywood – television shows and movies – continue to showcase moral relativism as if it is something that is good and necessary. Politicians stand on stages or before their colleagues and push for more and more flexibility in morality. Journalists report on these things with baited breath, eagerly waiting to write about how good and progressive it is that we are being more flexible on certain issues.

But, as we continue to move the goalpost back further and further, we lose sight of what is truly right or wrong. We have this idea that when we are given power, we are allowed to use it as we see fit. From Bill Clinton to Harvey Weinstein to Glenn Thrush and Charlie Rose, we see men who are showered with attention and recognized for their service to progressive politics and moral relativism. In return for this praise, their peers look away when they behave improperly.

Al Franken, a creature of both the entertainment industry and life on Capitol Hill, is a man who has enjoyed both lifestyles and has made himself a champion of progressive moral relativism. As a result, he is largely being given a pass on his past actions, where at least two women have tragic tales of being groped by the guy. Franken’s power and influence came from his celebrity status as a Saturday Night Live star. He ran for the U.S. Senate, won, and was treated like royalty.

Franken, like so many of these others, are men who represent the idea that might does make right – that power and influence can replace societal norms.

This is a cultural issue. It is not a political one. However, we must try to fight it, no matter who is guilty. After all, moral relativism is what gave us Donald Trump, as well. We, as a nation, sacrificed ideology in favor of bombast and anti-Clintonism. We gave up on ideas and chose instead to follow a cult of personality.

We sacrificed the moral high ground and elected a serial cheater, former Democrat (with all the liberal opinions that go with it), and for what? To have a world leader on Twitter who gets into arguments with Rosie O’Donnell, Joe Scarborough, and LaVar Ball?

Our side isn’t innocent. We just took the slower route to moral relativism. But, it appears we’re all catching up to each other. I just hope there is a cultural movement that can put a stop to it. And soon.