President Donald Trump speaks during a news conference with Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg in the East Room of the White House, Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Yesterday, the Washington Post ran a story on a leaked conversation President Trump had during a meeting on immigration. The contents of the conversation set the media ablaze as everyone read with shock and horror that the President of the United States referred to certain places as… well, it wasn’t nice.

Breathlessly, the media has covered this shiny and new scandal with all the fairness and objectivity you’ve come to expect. People actually said the swear word on the air. Jake Tapper had the decency to warn parents to mute the TV, which really only means everyone leans in and listens super close, before he said it. Headlines blared with the word uncensored. It appeared all over the place.

Once again, we are drawn into the miasma that is Words Of Donald Trump, and all other issues melt away as we focus entirely on the words that come out of the mouth of a man who has forgotten that some words need to stay inside his head sometimes. This is the most exhausting practice many of us have picked up since 2015, and it is a practice that we really should learn to let go of a bit more often.

I say that we, as humans who believe in right and wrong, don’t need to discuss that Donald Trump called them “****holes.” Instead, let’s focus on what makes them designatable as such.

What makes Haiti a place so bad that people frequently leave there for America? What about El Salvador? How about any African nation? Is it that America is the most desirable place to be? That’s part of it. The larger problem, however, is that there are many, many internal problems within many of these countries that make them incredibly difficult to live in.

Let’s take Haiti, for example.

This tiny island nation is led by corrupt bureaucrats who steal whatever aid money is given to the nation and grow fat off places like the U.S. while their own people starve. They are allowed to do so because the charity networks who raise money for Haitian causes tend to just bundle it and give it to the bureaucrats, and often in exchange for access to the nation for themselves. It will not shock you to discover that the Clinton Foundation is one such organization (oh, and Obama’s State Department gave preferential treatment to friends of the Clintons by helping them get their feet in the door in Haiti).

Or maybe El Salvador, where police are notoriously corrupt and government fat cats live large at the expense of its impoverished people. What about the other nations Trump talked about? Are they maybe paragons of good and proper government?

No. Each of these nations is filled with corrupt, leeching government officials who suckle at the teat of the American taxpayer with no oversight. So, if you want to be offended at the idea that these nations could be considered by someone a ****hole, then maybe you should also push for the American government to do more to make them less so.

One of the greatest annoyances I have at both the right and the left is their ability to ignore a major problem until it’s something they can raise campaign funds from.

Sure, we can grant some sort of passage to these people from other nations and give them a way to become citizens. But, that doesn’t stop the bleeding. The U.S. has the potential to help others in a meaningful way that doesn’t include giving money to another’s government with no stipulations. You can help these nations and staunch their bleeding while proving America has a heart and soul.

If you haven’t done something for Haiti, El Salvador, or any of those nations, however, then you are focused entirely on what the President said, and it’s your unhealthy obsession that will force our attention from what matters to what doesn’t matter.