As I wrote previously, the House version of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) initially removed the adoption tax credit.

Speaker Paul Ryan and others, including Chairman of the Ways and Means Committee, Rep. Kevin Brady, pointed to a $600 increase in the child tax credit in an effort to appease constituents.

Naturally, many on both sides of the aisle had a problem with the striking of this very necessary credit. Not to mention, such a move doesn’t look good if you’re a party that proclaims you’re pro-life and pro-family.

Thursday afternoon, after plenty of backlash, Representative Brady announced an amendment to the tax bill that would preserve the adoption tax credit, emphasis mine.

“I’m pleased to offer this amendment to the Amendment in the Nature of a Substitute on behalf of the majority on the Ways and Means Committee. Similar to the amendment I offered on Monday, this amendment will refine several provisions in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. It also takes action on three crucial priorities – helping American families, providing tax relief to Main Street startups, and increasing American competitiveness.

“Let’s start with helping families.

“First, among other important improvements, this amendment will preserve the adoption tax credit.

“Now, I know Americans who adopt are not doing this for the tax benefit – they’re doing it because they want to provide a safe and loving home for a child.

“I know from personal experience that the adoption process can be expensive and time consuming, and ultimately, so rewarding.

“And I know the adoption tax credit is important to many Members of our Committee, Republicans and Democrats – and we’ve had very thoughtful discussions about it over the past few days.

“So, with this amendment, we’re proposing to preserve this credit – a priority led by Ms. Black, Mr. Kelly, and so many others. This will ensure that parents can continue to receive additional tax relief as they open their hearts and their homes to an adopted child.”

This differs from previous statements where Rep. Brady, who has adopted children, tried to explain the credit’s use away.

“This credit is not working,” Brady said in an interview with The Washington Post.

“I think this is a better approach for the vast majority of Americans who are left behind,” Brady said.

Thankfully, the “thoughtful discussion” (and perhaps activist uproar?) spurred the preservation of this pro-family credit.

To be sure, there are other issues with the legislation, but if this is what it’s going to be, there is no need to strike a provision for Americans who could use the help as they expand their families.

Glad to see this update.