On Monday, Governor Phil Bryant of Mississippi signed the nation’s most restrictive abortion law.

This is a positive, life-affirming step in the right direction. While a fair number of states already have a 20-week abortion ban, none – until today – had a 15-week ban.

As reported, this makes The Magnolia State the most “hostile” to the legal homicide of abortion.

Bryant has now signed a law that makes his state the most difficult state in the country to get an abortion. It is called the Gestational Age Act, and it bans abortions after 15 weeks of gestation, except in the case of a medical emergency or a severe fetal abnormality. The law does not make exceptions in cases of rape or incest. The Mississippi House passed the measure on March 8, and Bryant signed it into law on Monday.

Naturally, there was quite an immediate uproar at the thought of excluding abortion to the first fourteen weeks and six days of pregnancy. It’s ironic how such a measure seems barbaric to those who willingly support ending the life of an unborn child because they’ve been deemed inconvenient.

Mere moments after the bill was signed, pro-aborts in the state mounted a legal challenge.

…the Jackson Women’s Health Organization, filed a complaint in United States District Court for Mississippi’s Southern District less than an hour after he signed the bill into law. The organization sought a preliminary injunction preventing officials from enforcing the act. Later Monday, the organization filed a motion for a temporary restraining order, said Robert B. McDuff, one of the lawyers for the clinic.

There is only one abortion clinic in the entire state of Mississippi, and this bill would – thankfully – further restrict its practice of ending life.

In a telephone interview late Monday, Diane Derzis, the owner of the clinic, said that a young woman whose pregnancy was beyond the 15-week limit was scheduled for an abortion on Tuesday.

Notice her sadness at the possibility of not being able to take the life of this woman’s unborn child as scheduled.

“She’s the first casualty of this bill,” Ms. Derzis said, unless the court grants the injunction. “That’s the saddest thing of all. We’re not talking about an issue here. We’re talking about people. This is a decision she made to better her life, and we’ve totally interfered with that.”

The real casualties of this “reproductive health” practice are the thousands of children whose lives are taken each day while they are growing and thriving in the womb.

It remains to be seen if this new law will hold up against a legal challenge or ultimately be defeated by lawyers and their bloodthirsty clientele.

Regardless, the passage of a 15-week abortion ban is a win for the pro-life cause and confirms that there are still legislators who place protecting the unborn at the top of the priority list.