Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa speaks during the Freedom Summit, Saturday, Jan. 24, 2015, in Des Moines, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Finally, the GOP is putting its foot down on (at least some) reprehensible behavior.

Last week, I wrote of Senator Tim Scott’s reaction to Representative Steve King’s lack of disgust concerning “white supremacist” and “white nationalist” language in a recent interview.

Some in our party wonder why Republicans are constantly accused of racism — it is because of our silence when things like this are said.

You see, King, who has a history of similarly unacceptable rhetoric, takes no issue with these terms. The problem is, they’re blatantly racist and anyone (elected official or general member of the electorate) who casually uses these terms or is somehow confused as to why they should never be uttered should be reprimanded and shown the door.

On Monday, Republican leadership made a move they should have made long ago.

House GOP leaders moved Monday to remove Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa) from all of his committee assignments following a firestorm over remarks considered racist.

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) told reporters after a meeting of the Republican Steering Committee that King would not receive any committee assignments for the new Congress.

The move by GOP leaders severely hamstrings King’s ability to wield influence as a member of Congress. The Agriculture Committee in particular is considered a prime spot for lawmakers like King who represent states with agricultural industries.

“We will not be seating Steve King on any committees in the 116th Congress,” McCarthy told reporters.

As it should be.

Republicans should never get to the point to where they look upon rhetoric meant to propel one race above another, shrug their shoulders, and act as if it’s no big deal. The fact remains, any kind of “supremacy” or “whites only” talk is pure evil and should never be tolerated by the GOP.

I’m just sorry that it took them this long to do something about it.

What does the future hold for King in general?

McCarthy declined to say if King should step down or be expelled from the House GOP conference, saying that “the voters of his district make those decisions.”

Personally, I’d love to see him and his putrescence expelled, but hopefully, voters hand him a defeat.

Enjoy your diminishing influence and disgraceful position in Congress, Mr. King. It’s well-deserved.

Kimberly Ross is a senior contributor at RedState and a contributor to the Washington Examiner’s Beltway Confidential blog. Follow her on Twitter and Facebook.