*This story has important updates that have since been covered in a subsequent post.

Recently there have been a spate of calls from various private sector entities to boycott states that have passed pro-life legislation in the vein of “heartbeat” bills. Alabama Governor Kay Ivey has pushed back against criticisms about the bill, saying:

You simply cannot defer protecting lives of unborn children because of cost.

Now another Alabama entity is refusing to bow to the boycott mob. NPR reports that the University of Alabama has returned a $21.5 million gift after the donor publicly called for industry boycotts of the state over the newly minted abortion laws. Furthermore, the school has opted to remove the donor’s name from their law school altogether.

The University of Alabama’s board of trustees has voted to return a $21.5 million gift from Hugh Culverhouse Jr. — the school’s biggest donor — and take his name off its law school. The move comes after Culverhouse urged businesses and prospective students to boycott the university and the state over Alabama’s new abortion law.

The school says the transaction to return the funds was processed Friday morning and that it will also return any accrued interest. Last fall, Culverhouse pledged to donate a total of $26.5 million over four years.

“The action taken by the Board today was a direct result of Mr. Culverhouse’s ongoing attempts to interfere in the operations of the Law School,” the university’s vice chancellor for communication, Kellee Reinhart, said Friday. “That was the only reason the Board voted to remove his name and return his money.”

Culverhouse seemed unphased by the move, saying it was not unexpected and while he did not demand his donation be returned he did not want his family to be associated with a system that “discriminates against women”. The Culverhouse family has been a supporter of Planned Parenthood since the 1950s.

“I expected this response from UA,” he said. “I will not allow my family’s name to be associated with an educational system that advocates a state law which discriminates against women, disregards established Federal law and violates our Constitution. I want to make clear that I never demanded that $21.5 million be refunded and wonder if the University is attempting to silence my opinions by their quick response. I will not be silenced.”

“The action taken by the Board today was a direct result of Mr. Culverhouse’s ongoing attempts to interfere in the operations of the Law School,” the university’s vice chancellor for communication, Kellee Reinhart, said Friday. “That was the only reason the Board voted to remove his name and return his money.”