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FILE – In this Jan. 15, 2016, file photo, Tyler Perry participates in a panel at the Fox Winter TCA in Pasadena, Calif. Perry took the 2017 Razzie Award for worst actress for “Boo 2! A Madea Halloween,” the 10th movie where the director donned a dress and played his signature character. (Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP, File)

Count media mogul Tyler Perry among those who is not in favor of defunding America’s police departments. In fact, Perry told CNN’s Anderson Cooper, we need more police officers on our streets.

No word if Anderson Cooper was inconsolable after the interview.

During a Wednesday night appearance on “Anderson Cooper 360,” Perry laid it out for Cooper, straight-up:

“You gotta understand this: I am not for taking money from the police department. I think we need more police. My studio is in a neighborhood where I think we need police. But we don’t need police who are undertrained.”

Translation: Training costs money.

Perry told Cooper that while he was initially optimistic about the way “everybody galvanized together” in the aftermath of George Floyd’s death, he later became concerned about the movement being “hijacked by some other groups.”

“I became very, very optimistic when everybody galvanized together, because I know that’s when change comes. When people galvanize and come together as one, that’s when change happens.

But lately, I’ve been very, very concerned that the message is being hijacked by some other groups, or political ads and parties that are trying to stop the message of what we’re asking for here is police reform.”


Not to contradict Tyler Perry, but left-wingers in Congress like Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) — not to mention the rioting activists and  their apologists in the media — want zero to do with reform. As I wrote in early July, AOC has been clear in her condemnation of reform:

Defunding police means defunding police. It does not mean budget tricks or funny math. It does not mean moving school police officers from the NYPD budget to the Department of Education’s budget so the exact same police remain in schools.

It does not mean counting cuts in overtime as cuts, even as NYPD ignores every attempt by City Council to curb overtime spending and overspends on overtime anyways. The fight to defund policing continues.

Nonetheless, Perry told Cooper that when he first heard about the “defund” movement, he was “troubled” by it, although, he said, he understands “some of the things” behind it.

“When I first heard it, I was troubled by it. I thought, ‘OK, this is gonna be weaponized in this political year.’ I completely thought that that was happening, that’s exactly what’s happened. It’s been weaponized.

Some of the things inside of defund the police, I really understand. Like having officers who are clinically trained to deal with certain situations. I think all of those things are helpful, but taking money from the police department to make the police department smaller, that troubles me.”

Perry’s support of the nation’s law enforcement officers isn’t new, which he demonstrated just two weeks ago, as reported by Fox News:

Atlanta-based media mogul Tyler Perry is doing what he can to bring his fractured city together.

The creator of the “Madea” film franchise bought 1,000 Kroger’s supermarket gift cards — and turned them over to Atlanta police to hand out to the community, his office said Thursday.

“This is about the community that I love, that I live and work in,” Perry said in a statement. “This about good people who are in need of a hand up, not a hand out.”

“This is about the good police officers who do their job well every day, some of which are my personal friends,” the statement said. “This is about trying to bridge unity in a city that adopted me and held me up high enough to reach my own branch on the tree of success.”

Photos supplied by Perry and posted on Twitter by Atlanta cops show officers fanning out throughout the Atlanta’s Zone 1 and Zone 3 police districts distributing the $50 gift cards and donating groceries at a local community center.

“500 food boxes were distributed to families in need this morning during the grocery giveaway event at the Dunbar Red Center,” the department said in another tweet. “@tylerperry donated 1,000 Kroger gift cards to give out to the community. Thanks to all of those stopped by & to our partner agencies.”

Needless to say, Tyler Perry doesn’t fit the mold of the bitter, groupthink Hollywood Left that continues to condemn America’s police officers, without so much as a suggestion that there are hundreds of thousands of dedicated officers throughout America, many of whom put their lives on the line on a daily basis.

So why does Perry lack the bitterness? Where is the blind anger? Where is the unfounded hatred that we see histrionically played out on social media, and on our riot-torn city streets on a nightly basis?

Perhaps this tweet says it best:

I might not always agree with Tyler Perry on the issues — including his staunch support of Barack Obama — but I do admire his character and desire to see more than one side of the controversial issues currently gripping America; a rare commodity, these days, indeed.

Yep, Tyler Perry is one of the good guys.

Mike Miller
Political junkie. Former senior writer and editor at Independent Journal Review. Realist. Slayer of hypocrisy. Sports lover (except for soccer, of course). Insufferable pizza snob.
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