On Earth Day, there will be much talk of Global Warming, Carbon Dioxide, and all that other voodoo. The truth is, conservatives most avoid those traps, and focus on basic principles of conservation.


Vice President Al Gore, right, chats with television host Bill Nye “The Science Guy” during an Earth Day ceremony on the Anacostia River in Washington Tuesday, April 22, 1997. Tuesday marked the 27th anniversary of Earth Day. (AP Photo/Doug Mills)

Hypocrisy is an over-used word these days, but the hypocrisy of the leaders of the Earth Day movement show how fraudulent it is.

Al Gore and other Planeteers fly in their jets to Davos, they live in large homes using the energy of dozens of regular people’s homes, drive in large, private cars in place of public, mass transportation, and they use their cloud computing and live an always-on digital lifestyle.

Why should we, as conservatives, as Americans, and as human beings, support policies promoted by these people? In their rhetoric, they call it an imperative matter of saving the world that we “go green,” and yet they live like it’s all talk. That’s because it is all talk, so we should ignore it.

And what about the science? The facts simply aren’t there. Science is all about making predictions, and the Earth Day movement is very bad at making them. Their predictions in the 70s were laughably wrong, as were their predictions in the 80s and 90s. But they want us to trust them this time!

Even their more recent ones are failing: They predicted an increase in hurricanes, while we had a massive drought in major hurricanes. They predicted rising temperatures, while then the University of East Anglia famously had to fudge their numbers to, as they put it, “hide the decline.”

Their citations of historical trends are also fraudulent. The UN’s “hockey stick” graph showing calamitous warming outside of anything we’ve seen in history, is one of the biggest lies in the history of science. The famous graph was predicated on uncalibrated, untested, pretty much useless tree ring cuttings which have been cited as signaling both warming and cooling, depending on the pet theory of the day.

President Barack Obama, right, arrives with actor Leonardo DiCaprio, left, and Dr. Katharine Hayhoe, to talk about climate change as part of the White House South by South Lawn event on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Monday, Oct. 3, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

So while the Earth Day movement is a failure in every angle of science they’ve attempted, both in looking at the past, and in predicting the future, we do have ways to show our appreciation for our natural environment on Earth Day. The tried and true principle of conservation remains a way we can make our surroundings better for ourselves, and our children.

The truth is, we’ve made progress. We have so much more forest in America than we did in the past, because our own advances of science and technology have allowed us to do that. We’re bettering the environment. We can be an example to other nations.

By being ever-better stewards of the planet, we can ensure that we leave it better than we found it. We can be more efficient, we can reuse more, and we can set aside natural preserves. We can look for ways to address light pollution, making the night sky visible to our grandchildren the way it was visible to our grandparents.

This planet is the only on we’ve got. To protect it, we must abandon wild-eyed Earth Day theories, and instead apply common sense to conserve what we’ve got.