Not So Moderate: Klobuchar Against English Being the National Language of the United States

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., speaks during a Democratic presidential primary debate Thursday, Dec. 19, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)

 

Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) has been getting more attention since the last debate as more centrist Democrats worried about the implosion of Joe Biden are casting about for a “moderate” for whom they might vote.

Now, of course, they’re all pretty left so people searching for moderates are out of luck. It’s a big question as to whether a moderate could even get the nomination with how left some Democrats in the base are. Which, of course, could then place them in real trouble in the general election with an America that has already indicated it’s not going to be receptive to a socialist for president.

But one indication of Klobuchar not being so moderate is how she’s now switched positions on the question of English being the official language of the United States.

From AP:

Democratic presidential candidate Amy Klobuchar says she no longer believes English should be the national language of the U.S., disavowing a vote she took more than a decade ago as she tries to build support in a state where Hispanics make up a critical constituency.

Campaigning in Las Vegas, the three-term Minnesota senator said Friday that she has changed her stance since voting for an English-language amendment in 2007 and has “taken a strong position against” it. She also blasted President Donald Trump for using immigrants as “wedges” and said as president she would work with Republicans to achieve comprehensive immigration reform.

Klobuchar’s record on immigration is under scrutiny after her third-place finish in the New Hampshire primary this week revived her campaign and sent her on to Nevada’s Feb. 22 caucuses with fresh momentum. After focusing much of her campaign on the first two voting states — Iowa and New Hampshire, both predominantly white — she’s now navigating a much more diverse electorate, where some of her moderate positions and willingness to vote with her Republican colleagues could be a liability.

She tried to explain herself.

“I think that when you look at a state like this state, and a country like ours that is so diverse, you don’t want to have that provision in law because then it would be very difficult to have, say, government documents and other things translated into other languages,” she said Friday. “So that is not a position I take. I did vote that way, but way back then, along with many other people.”

Translation: I need your votes now, so I’m pandering and throwing my positions under the bus.

Mayor Pete Buttigieg hit her on immigration positions including that she voted for Trump’s appointee Kevin McAleenan to head the CBP. Klobuchar responded by saying that other Democrats supported McAleenan and she disagrees “vehemently” with Trump’s border policies. So she disagrees with the policies that have worked? That should go over well.

According to Townhall, Americans overwhelmingly support English as the national language.