AP featured image
Seattle police block a street with their bikes in the Capitol Hill Organized Protest zone early Wednesday, July 1, 2020. Police in Seattle have torn down demonstrators’ tents in the city’s occupied protest zone after the mayor ordered it cleared. (AP Photo/Aron Ranen)

You have to hand it to the Seattle BLM folks for complete gall with their latest move.

Five of them have sued the city claiming that because of police crowd control methods, they are being “priced” out of “protesting” because they’re unable to buy protective gear.

So here’s a thought? Why do you need protective gear if you’re just “peacefully protesting?”

Amazing how little tear gas or rubber bullets there are when police aren’t being attacked.

Here’s a copy of the complaint.

From Daily Wire:

“The five plaintiffs in the lawsuit allege that the purchase of helmets, gas masks, protective clothing, goggles, gloves, boots, umbrellas and other gear they say are needed to fend off police pepper spray, less-lethal projectiles and other crowd-dispersal tools has impinged on their civil right to peacefully protest,” the outlet noted.

The five women were involved in protests in the Capitol Hill zone, and “claim that repeated use of force by SPD during more than six weeks of civil unrest over systemic racism and police brutality against people of color has made it impossible to exercise their right to gather and protest without personal protective gear, which isn’t cheap.”

“Because protesters now must purchase expensive equipment to be assured that they will be able to protest safely, the indiscriminate use of weapons by SPD implicates equal protection,” the women allege in their complaint.

So they’re essentially trying to argue that this puts an effective tax on their ability to protest.

You have to give them points for creativity.

What do they want?

They want a temporary restraining order preventing the city from using such methods to stop them.

It’s just the latest effort to stop police efforts to control violence at “protests.” Protesters previously had been trying to get the use of crowd control methods stopped and the city council had banned tear gas and pepper spray. A federal judge temporarily stopped the city from implementing such a law.

The protesters speacifically referenced July 25 action. But that was the day that 59 Seattle Police officers were injured from “peaceful protesters” in a rampage throughout the city even involving an attack on the East Precinct itself.