If it’s been said once it’s been said a thousand times whenever people talk about inserting politics at awards shows. People want more of it. “More politics at awards shows!” is all one hears all day long.

A conversation about an awards show cannot go on for more than 30 seconds without someone saying, “you know, I just wish they’d get more into politics during the speeches.”

Obviously, that’s sarcastic and is generally the exact opposite of what most Americans say they want during non-political events, such as sports and awards shows that attract Americans from all different walks of life and political ideologies.

As Jay Caruso pointed out previously, ESPN’s SportsCenter was the best sports commentary shows on television until the hosts decided to start weighing in on politics. Today, people who used to love the show won’t watch and the ratings have suffered over time as a result.

Rather than maintaining an all-are-welcome mentality, Grammy Awards producer Ken Ehrlich is putting out the “Your Kind Ain’t Welcome Here” sign this year.

“One of the tenets of our show is artistic freedom, and over the years we’ve shown we do believe in it,” Ehrlich told Variety. “How many more times do we need to hear ‘I’d like to thank my publicist, my agent, my wife and kids.’ The great acceptance speeches are ones that have a point of view and are more personal.”

The only guidelines on speech that Ehrlich has to keep an eye (and ear) on is profanity, given the potential for CBS to be hit with FCC fines if F-bombs fly before 10 p.m. But almost everything else is fair game.

“One of the things I’ve learned from working with artists for 40 years is that they are deep-thinking, vital individuals who have interests that cover a broad cover a broad spectrum of subjects and passions,” he said. “We should certainly allow for it on the broadcast.”

Deep-thinking and vital…and with nary any diversity of thought it seems. How brave. How truly courageous.

Woe to anyone sitting in that room who either voted for Republicans. Or if they simply feel that Donald Trump is president and as Americans we now need to figure out a way to make the best of the next four years, because that voice will be suppressed, oppressed and likely chased out of town if discovered.

Let’s be very clear, what Ehrlich is hoping for is the #Resist crowd, sitting in an echo chamber of leftists, will get up and spout off about Donald Trump and Republicans.

While the Grammys are still a ratings powerhouse, the award show hit a seven year low in 2016. Apparently, politics is more important than appealing to a wider audience of music lovers.