On Wednesday, Frank Stephens, a man with Down Syndrome, gave a powerful speech about the worth of his life and inherent value the Down Syndrome community adds to society.

Stephens made his emotionally stirring speech before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies which held a hearing to discuss medical research in regards to Down Syndrome.

“Whatever you learn today, please remember this: I am a man with Down syndrome and my life is worth living,” Stephens said, eliciting a round of supportive applause.

He went on to add, “Seriously, I don’t feel I should have to justify my existence,” he added. “Is there really no place for us in the world?”

Watch:

In light of recent news of both Iceland and Denmark eradicating Down Syndrome among their populations via abortion following a genetic marker test during pregnancy, the Down Syndrome community is clearly under attack and at risk of being aborted out of existence in developed countries.

“I completely understand that the people pushing this particular ‘final solution’ are saying that people like me should not exist. That view is deeply prejudiced by an outdated idea of life with Down syndrome,” Stephens said.

Indeed it is.

The United States still has places where “Ugly Laws” are on the books. They’re largely forgotten and unenforced if so, but regardless, the fact they were passed a century ago is a stark reminder of the shadowed existence the developmentally and physically handicapped used to live.

Eradicating anyone with a physical disability or genetic mutation is simply another way to remove anyone other than perfect human specimens from the public eye.

Nineteenth century “Ugly Laws” may no longer be in practice, but it’s been replaced by the ugliest and most heinous law of the land in the form of Roe v. Wade. Enough.

(h/t Washington Free Beacon)