When the “student-led” anti-gun walk-out happened earlier this month, a lot of people questioned the appropriateness of schools allowing students and teachers to leave class without penalty when under other circumstances it would not be condoned.

One dad of a 6th-grade student in the Ventura Unified School District decided to confront the school’s principal to demand to know why his son’s classmates and teachers were told they could leave if they want to.

John Gunn took video of the confrontation and posted it to YouTube.

“This is from my son, who doesn’t lie, ‘if you want to leave, you can leave.’ You told the teachers ‘if you want to go, you can go.’ Somebody told them that.”

She answered, “I would never make a teacher ever shut the door and keep a student inside the classroom.”

“You’re telling me a 12-year-old can just walk out of the class?” he fired back. “Why can’t you just say, ‘No you can’t go.’ They’re 12-year-olds.”

Except a 6th grader would never be allowed to simply get up and leave class unless they were sick, had a prearranged excuse from their parents, or perhaps to use the restroom. If they did, they’d be reprimanded in some way on any other day and for any other purpose.

As we’ve seen in the case of Rocklin High School teacher Julianne Benzel, if you try to point that double standard out, you’ll be swiftly dealt with.

Schools took a side in the gun walk-out and eschewed their standard rules for students leaving class in a latent show of support for the walk-out. And while I wouldn’t advocate for showing up at schools and dressing down employees on camera, parents have every right to be upset about what was allowed last week.

When teachers and administrators start to bend the rules because they either agree with the pet issue or worse, fear the students, it’s a serious issue parents and society must deal with as long as we have public schools.