Sen. Martha McSally (R-AZ)

Sen. Martha McSally (R-AZ). Screen grab via CBS This Morning.

As Red State‘s Brandon Morse wrote yesterday, Sen. Martha McSally (R-AZ) opened up during a Senate hearing Wednesday about a horrific sexual attack she says happened to her when she was in the Air Force.

A recap via Fox News:

Sen. Martha McSally, the first female fighter pilot to fly in combat, disclosed during an emotional Senate hearing on Wednesday she was “preyed upon and then raped” in the Air Force by a superior officer.

The Arizona Republican, who served 26 years in the Air Force, made the disclosure during a Senate hearing on sexual assault allegations in the military. McSally said she didn’t report the assault because she didn’t trust the system, and was ashamed and confused.

[…]

“I stayed silent for many years, but later in my career, as the military grappled with the scandals, and their wholly inadequate responses, I felt the need to let some people know I too was a survivor,” she said, choking up as she detailed what had happened to her. “I was horrified at how my attempt to share generally my experiences was handled. I almost separated from the Air Force at 18 years of service over my despair. Like many victims, I felt like the system was raping me all over again.”

Watch the video below as McSally recounted her experience and the aftermath of it:

McSally was on CBS‘s “This Morning” today and talked more about her story:

It shouldn’t be a surprise to anyone who has payed attention to their outlandish rhetoric over the years that some “feminists” took the opportunity to use Sally’s own words in order to take political potshots at her expense.

Feminist author Jill Filipovic tweeted:

This is actually pure bull s**t, but Filipovic knows that already. Using a woman’s heartwrenching story about being raped against her because she’s from the opposing political party is just about as low as it gets.

She knows that, too, but narratives and what not.

Filipovic, sadly, wasn’t the only one, as The Daily Caller points out:

Tiffany Cross, of The Beat DC, jumped in immediately to shift the focus to President Donald Trump. “The safety of women should matter to all people,” she said, arguing that the issue should not be partisan. “But it does beg the question how some Republicans stand by this president, who himself is accused of sexually assaulting over 20 women.”

It was former State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki who turned the conversation back to McSally…

[…]

“I think by speaking her mind she is using her platform for good. That should be applauded,” Psaki began. “I think what’s hard to grapple with is the fact she supported Kavanaugh.”

This is the exact same thing Democratic women did to Iowa Senator Joni Ernst when she revealed back in January that she had been a victim of a sexual assault while in college. In explaining why invoking her support of Kavanaugh was wrong, I wrote:

For many survivors, it’s hard enough to open up privately to family members and friends and admit to being sexually assaulted or raped because they feel shame and, unfortunately, blame themselves. It’s doubly hard when you’re a high-profile public figure who wants to be viewed as tough as nails and able to “hang with the big boys.”

Senator Ernst deserves our compassion and respect at this time, and we need to make sure that the false comparisons being made about her support of Kavanaugh versus her #MeToo moment remain the exception, and not the rule.

That same rule applies here to McSally’s story. There should be no “It’s good she’s telling her story BUT” nonsense. Feminists just need to contain their glee, and acknowledge the situation as one of a woman courageously coming forward to openly talk about her painful experiences in order to make a difference in the lives of others, and leave it at that.

—————————————
Sister Toldjah is a former liberal and a 15+ year veteran of blogging with an emphasis on media bias, social issues, and the culture wars. Read her Red State archives here. Connect with her on Twitter.–