If you’re of the mindset that you want to be able to transport your groceries in plastic bags, and don’t want the government to regulate a business’s usage of them, the state of Oklahoma agrees with you.

The Oklahoman reports:

Gov. Kevin Stitt on Tuesday signed a bill that preempts Oklahoma municipalities from imposing fees on single-use plastic and paper bags

In the short term, the legislation affects Norman, where city officials contemplated imposing a 5-cent tax on plastic and paper bags. But the bill prevents all Oklahoma cities and towns from taxing single-use bags and carryout or to-go containers.

Stitt signed the bill into law the day after Earth Day.

The bill rescues more than just plastic bags from bans:

A. As used in this section, “auxiliary container” means any bag, cup, package, container, bottle, device or other packaging that is:

1. Made of cloth, paper, plastic, including foamed or expanded plastic, cardboard, corrugated material, aluminum, glass, postconsumer recycled material or similar material including, but
not limited to, coated or laminated materials; and

2. Designed for, but not limited to, consuming, transporting, or protecting merchandise, food or beverages from, or at, a food service facility, manufacturing, distribution, further processing, or retail facility.

It effectively bans fees on these items as well.

According to the AP, members of the business community were in favor of the bill while environmentalists lined up against it:

The bill was supported by retailers and container manufacturers who claimed municipal bag ordinances would reduce consumer choice and increase the cost of groceries and packaged food. Opponents maintained the measure is government overreach that will prevent municipalities from limiting a leading source of litter and pollution.

On the other hand, states like New York and California have already implemented various plastic bag ban policies over the last few years. Maine may be the next state to put a statewide ban in place.

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Sister Toldjah is a former liberal and a 15+ year veteran of blogging with an emphasis on media bias, social issues, and the culture wars. Read her Red State archives here. Connect with her on Twitter.–