Air conditioners

We’ve hit that time of year when the “air conditioning is sexist!!” argument typically gets trotted out by woke feminists who firmly believe the patriarchy is behind the frigid AC temperatures they have to endure in the summer months in their offices.

This year’s example comes from Taylor Lorenz, who writes for The Atlantic. On Sunday, Lorenz tweeted out a fairly balanced piece on the debate from style writer Penelope Green at the New York Times. But while Green’s take on the issue was firmly on middle ground, Lorenz’s most definitely was not:

Because her tweet was getting ratioed, Lorenz moved on to her next link, which was a piece from May on the same issue by one of her colleagues at The Atlantic. In another tweet, she chided male colleagues for having the audacity to want to be cooler in the summer even if it meant the poor thing might have to cover up a little more in the office:

Twitter users promptly schooled Lorenz on some of the main reasons why men typically want it cooler indoors than women do in the summer. And after all was said and done, it was Lorenz who came off as the one making a sexist argument:

National Review‘s Charles C.W. Cooke got to the heart of the matter on why the #BanAC movement is all wrong and insufficiently woke:

There’s also the privilege thing:

As to the “gotten sick” complaint, well there’s a reason for that:

For what it’s worth, I’m with these ladies on this one:

This is anecdotal to be sure, but I’ve found over the years when working in office environments that reaching a happy medium with your co-workers usually works – in the coldest months of the year and the hottest. In the summer, if the guys want it at 74 and the ladies prefer it at 78, propose 76.

And bring a sweater.

This really is not rocket science. It’s called “working together.” Instead of trying to find fault in every danged thing, people should try taking that route instead.

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— Based in North Carolina, Sister Toldjah is a former liberal and a 15+ year veteran of blogging with an emphasis on media bias, social issues, and the culture wars. Read her Red State archives here. Connect with her on Twitter. –