In the immediate aftermath of horrific mass shootings like the ones that happened in El Paso, TX and Dayton, OH over the weekend, one of the first orders of business for Democrats is to shut down anyone who says the victims are in their thoughts and prayers.

So it was no surprise to anyone that CNN media firefighter Brian Stelter, who only masquerades as an impartial journalist, adopted a similar tactic and ran with it on Sunday.

Stelter took to the Twitter machine midday yesterday to “report” on at least six different instances where Sen. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) offered prayers to the victims of past shooting tragedies and their respective communities:

Was this supposed to be an act of journalism or something? It sure didn’t appear that way to a number of Twitter users, who took him to task in the comments:

Here was Stelter’s response to the criticism:

Red State‘s Brad Slager and Joe Cunningham weren’t buying what Stelter was selling and let him know it:

Sadly, Stelter is not above such childish mockery, nor is he above blatantly displaying double standards when it comes to holding Democrats and Republicans to the same standards. Case in point:

I wrote this in response to Sen. Cory Booker’s despicable rant against people offering their thoughts and prayers after the UNC Charlotte mass shooting that happened here in April. Re-upping today because it still holds true:

Thoughts and prayers provide an immeasurable feeling of comfort and peace and – for some – answers in the aftermath of tragedy and loss. In the days after the UNCC gunman stormed the Kennedy building at the university, prayer vigils and prayer walks were held on campus. Individually, students held hands, hugged each other, and prayed together.

People all across the city and state – and the nation – offered their thoughts and prayers for Charlotte in the aftermath. As a person of faith myself who was in so much shock after it happened, it provided me comfort and solace as I began the grieving and healing processes.

Any person of faith who has read and studied the Bible knows better than to say that offering up thoughts and prayers is meaningless. It’s reprehensible that Sen. Booker has decided to play the “who is the truuuue person of faith” game but he’s on the campaign trail, so I guess that’s to be expected. Shame.

What’s Stelter’s motivation for playing this game? To carry the left’s water on these issues, naturally, which is par for the course for such a dishonest fraud.

If CNN is trying to earn back the trust they’ve lost with viewers and readers over the years, they sure have a lousy way of showing it.

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— Based in North Carolina, Sister Toldjah is a former liberal and a 15+ year veteran of blogging with an emphasis on media bias, social issues, and the culture wars. Read her Red State archives here. Connect with her on Twitter. –