Video: Soccer Coach Teaches Media an Important Lesson on Why They Shouldn’t Ask Him Coronavirus Questions

A worker wearing a face mask sprays disinfectant along a path in Wuhan in central China’s Hubei Province, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2020. (AP Photo/Arek Rataj)

There has been so much information spread about the coronavirus over the last several weeks that it’s become increasingly difficult – almost impossible, really – to separate fact from fiction.

Part of the reason for that, of course, is because there are people being asked to comment or otherwise make observations about the disease who have no business doing so.

That includes the Democratic politicians who have despicably played politics with the virus because it’s an election year and Orange Man Bad, which only ensures that people will become more misinformed and confused, which in turn creates further panic.

But a soccer coach became the hero of the day today when a video of him responding to a reporter’s question about the coronavirus went viral. A journalist asked the coach if he was worried about the spread of the coronavirus or how the coronavirus might affect him or his team. The coach’s response was one for the ages:

“Look, what I don’t like in life is that a very serious thing, a football manager’s opinion is important. I don’t understand that. If I asked you, you are in exactly the same role as I am. So it’s not important what famous people say. We have to speak about things in the right manner, not people with no knowledge like me talking about something that people with knowledge will talk about it, and should tell the people do this, do that, and everything will be fine or not. Not football managers, I don’t understand that.

Politics, coronavirus. Why me? I wear a base cap and have a bad shave.”

Watch:

Honestly, “why me?” should be the standard response for anyone, especially self-important celebrities and other public figures, who don’t have the expertise, knowledge, and insight to comment on this issue, or any other important issue for that matter but who nevertheless do because they think it makes them look smart.

It doesn’t.

If more people responded to media questions like this instead of pretending to be experts, our country and a lot of other countries for that matter would be a lot better off.

Sister Toldjah
North Carolina-based Sister Toldjah, a former liberal, has been writing about media bias, social issues, and the culture wars since 2003. Follow her on Parler here.
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