Debunked: AOC Says Single Payer System Helped South Korea Fight Wuhan Coronavirus, Receipts Say Differently

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., speaks at a news conference with Democratic presidential candidate, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., to call for legislation to cancel all student debt, at the Capitol in Washington, Monday, June 24, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

As my RedState colleague Bonchie wrote Thursday, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) is busy using the Wuhan coronavirus outbreak as an opportunity to promote socialism. She tweeted out some “emergency measures” proposals Wednesday which included calls for universal basic income programs and “eviction freezes”, none of which would stop the virus from spreading.

Because she’s fond of never letting a crisis go to waste, the freshman Congresswoman took to the Twitter machine again on Thursday to make claims about South Korea and their response to the Wuhan coronavirus pandemic. In her tweet, she alleged that “a major reason” South Korea has been able to respond more quickly to the outbreak is because they have a single payer healthcare system:

The problem with AOC’s argument is that … it’s simply not true to say single payer is the “major reason” for South Korea’s aggressive response, especially when you consider the fact Italy also has a single payer system but is faring much worse, as others pointed out:

There are other reasons as well, as Joel Pollak explains:

Pollack went into more detail here on the differences in how the two countries have handled the crisis:

A new report by Reuters that compares South Korea and Italy notes that South Korea’s aggressive coronavirus testing system has been accompanied by a widespread system of electronic surveillance that tracks potential contacts of those infected. “South Korea’s system is an intrusive mandatory measure that depends on people surrendering what, for many in Europe and America, would be a fundamental right of privacy,” Reuters notes.

[…]

Moreover, CNN reports, South Korea’s aggressive testing was made possible because of a private company called Seegene that was able to ramp up production. The government cut the usual red tape to allow the kits to be made.

Beyond that, South Korea did a better job at sealing their borders early on and their leaders weren’t telling people to “go out and hug a Chinese person” – or anyone else. Also, Italy has a higher percentage of elderly citizens, and senior citizens and people with underlying conditions are the most at risk.

There are many reasons why South Korea has rapidly responded to the outbreak and seems to be faring better. Single payer healthcare is not one of them.

Sister Toldjah
North Carolina-based Sister Toldjah, a former liberal, has been writing about media bias, social issues, and the culture wars since 2003. Follow her on Parler here.
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