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Former Democratic candidate for Georgia Governor, Stacey Abrams, speaks before a Democratic presidential primary debate, Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2019, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

I wrote Monday about how Joe Biden’s female vice presidential hopefuls were utterly and thoroughly discrediting themselves and the “Believe All Women” philosophy they once subscribed to by displaying different standards for Tara Reade’s sexual assault allegations against Joe Biden than they did for Dr. Christine Blasey Ford’s allegations against then-SCOTUS nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

But while their hypocrisy has revealed much about these women that most of us already knew about way before now, Stacey Abrams has perhaps eclipsed them all with comments she made yesterday on Reade’s allegations and whether or not she believed Reade or Biden

Here’s what she said:

She confirmed her statement in an interview she did with CNN’s Don Lemon Tuesday night, citing that biased New York Times report as a “thorough” investigation that did not find the allegations “credible”:

Here was Stacey Abrams a couple of years ago, though, during the debate over Kavanuagh’s Supreme Court nomination:

What’s changed? Abrams desperately wants to be Biden’s VP, so much so that she is reportedly calling up other Democrats to get them to tout her “qualifications” to Biden.

To amplify a point I made earlier this week about all of this, the point of this exercise is not to convince women that if you support one woman’s allegations you should support them all. The point is to call out how believability standards should not be based on the political party affiliation of the person being accused.

In reality, the totality of the evidence should be the determining factor. And if Abrams was having a sincere change of heart here on automatically believing all women, it should be applauded. But it’s not sincere, and we all know it.

For Sen. Kamala Harris, Sen. Amy Klobuchar, Abrams, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (D-MI) and all the rest, their convenient flip flop on believing on all women is a stark and troubling reminder that their “believing” primarily boils down to how and if it can advance their political ambitions.

Sister Toldjah
Based in North Carolina, Sister Toldjah is a former liberal and a 16+ year writer with an emphasis on media bias, social issues, and the culture wars.
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