AP featured image
Subcommittee Chairman Ted Cruz, R-TX, speaks as FAA Acting Administrator Daniel Elwell, NTSB Chairman Robert Sumwalt, and DOT I.G. Calvin Scovel appear before a Senate Transportation subcommittee hearing on commercial airline safety, on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, March 27, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Because there seems to be no end in sight to the Wuhan coronavirus lockdowns in states like Michigan and California, some Democrats are promoting the idea of canceling rent and mortgage payments until the virus crisis is behind us.

But with some of the stricter “stay at home” restrictions being in effect in certain parts of the country until mid-June if not longer, such suggestions have led to questions – such as where would this leave landlords? Because they would, of course, still be on the hook.

Other questions include wondering when a potential moratorium on rent and mortgage payments should be realistically set to expire if such a rule were put in place. Should there be a firm expiration date, or should it be made to be flexible and open-ended, the latter of which is the more viable option for admitted socialists like Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) who believe everything should be “free”?

On Monday, failed presidential candidate Sanders renewed his call for the cancellation of house payments for the (un)foreseeable future:

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) caught wind of it, and had a better idea:

Oh, heck yeah! Others chimed in in agreement:

Not pictured: My high five and the high fives of countless others who could think of lots of better ways to spend their money than Uncle Sam during – and after – this crisis.

Sister Toldjah
North Carolina-based Sister Toldjah, a former liberal, has been writing about media bias, social issues, and the culture wars since 2003. Follow her on Parler here.
Read more by Sister Toldjah