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Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., arrives for a vote on Gina Haspel to be CIA director, on Capitol Hill, Thursday, May 17, 2018 in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

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Not only is it insulting, but it’s also got to be exhausting for Sen. Tim Scott (R-SC) to be constantly subjected to disgusting allegations from Democrats, “woke” left-wing activists, and liberally-biased media figures that Senate Republicans “use” him as a “token” when it comes to talking about racially sensitive issues and/or addressing legislation related to race.

Scott usually handles such derogatory claims with the dignity and grace he’s been known for throughout his time in politics, but he took a bit of a different (and far more satisfying) approach after hearing about what fellow Senator Dick Durbin (D-IL) said about the police reform bill Republicans unveiled today, a bill which Scott led the way in crafting:

“Subtle” indeed.

Sen. Scott, however, wasn’t so subtle in his response. Scott casually asked Durbin about whether or not Democrats were “still wearing” the African kente cloths many of them wore last week during a photo op moment of silence for George Floyd that was widely criticized by even by other Democrats as shameless pandering to the black community:

Here’s a photo of that moment, for anyone who missed it:

Last week, Scott also took to the Twitter machine to slam social media keyboard warriors on the left who have called him a “token” throughout the process of crafting the legislation introduced earlier today:

Ouch. I’d say that settles the “racial diversity gap in the Senate” debate. Next?

Update: Scott also addressed Durbin’s remarks on the Senate floor in an emotional speech given on the 5 year anniversary of the racially-motivated Emanuel 9 mass shooting in South Carolina:

Related –>> The Kente Cloth Worn by Democrats During Their Kneeling Virtue Signal Has Highly Racist Connections

Sister Toldjah
North Carolina-based Sister Toldjah, a former liberal, has been writing about media bias, social issues, and the culture wars since 2003. Follow her on Parler here.
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