AP featured image
FILE – This April 15, 2013 file photo shows the headquarters for National Public Radio (NPR) on North Capitol Street in Washington. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)

——–

Like most other liberally-biased national news outlets, NPR has done everything they can to portray violent agitators who join social justice marches in the most flattering and sympathetic of lights, and this past weekend was no exception.

NPR national correspondent Hannah Allam filed a report Sunday detailing a number of incidents where protesters have been hit by cars over the last several weeks in the aftermath of the death of George Floyd. The article painted the incidents as part of an alleged epidemic of vehicular targeting by far-rightists that they say has been going on for years whenever there is a race-related march.

Unfortunately for them, the point they were trying to make in the article was overshadowed by the fact that the original featured image they used was from an incident involving a car driver in Louisville who had been cornered and harassed by protesters.

According to video footage of the incident, the person tried to back away from the protesters who were beating on the car and allegedly reaching into it to attack the driver. When backing away only made agitators madder, the person hit the gas and in the process hit a protester who bounced off the hood of the car and then beside it.

Watch and see for yourself:

An image from that incident was used in Allam’s piece. NPR deleted the original tweet that included the image, but Twitter user @redsteeze snagged a screengrab:

Understandably, people were upset and called out NPR, alerting them to the full story about what happened in the Louisville attack:

Also, questions were raised about the methodology used in determining the number of allegedly “deliberate” incidents described in the article itself:

NPR noted the (deliberate?) error in their reporting:

But it wasn’t enough, as #DefundNPR trended most of the day Sunday after the story was published.

Sadly, NPR wasn’t the only news outlet caught spreading fake news about the incident:

To the extent that anyone is deliberately driving to these protests in order to hit people with their vehicles, those people should be punished to the fullest extent of the law. But in incidents where drivers have stumbled on to protests by accident and protesters won’t let them leave the area, I’d like for journalists including Allam to explain what those drivers should do in order to protect themselves and any passengers they may have in their cars from out of control mobs.

This a serious discussion that needs to be had, considering how often law enforcement officials in cities across the country allow protesters to block off interstates and city streets, which not only puts car drivers in danger, but also prevents emergency services from being able to respond to calls in a timely manner.

Sister Toldjah
North Carolina-based Sister Toldjah, a former liberal, has been writing about media bias, social issues, and the culture wars since 2003. Follow her on Parler here.
Read more by Sister Toldjah